War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1093 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 14.

Richmond, January 18, 1865.

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XVIII. The battalion organization of the First battalion Virginia Artillery (formerly First Regiment) is hereby dissolved. The batteries composing it will be assigned under the orders of the commanding general.

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XXX. Colonel S. Crutchfield, artillery, Provisional Army, C. S., is relieved from his present service, and will report to General R. E. Lee, commanding, &C., for assignment to duty with the Army of Northern Virginia.

BY command of Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JONHSON'S DIVISION,

January 18, 1865.

Major DUNCAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I have nothing of importance to report this morning. Two men deserted from Gracie's and three from Wise's brigade last night. No casualties to report.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY A. WISE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

STATE OF NORTHERN CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Raleigh, January 18, 1865.

GOVERNOR: The present condition of affairs makes it proper that I should again seek communication with my brother Governors for the purpose of mutual counsel and assistance. The march of Sherman through Georgia, his threatened advance through South Carolina, and the recent disasters involved in the defeat of General Hood and the fall of the principal defensive work of Wilmington, have resuscitated the desire of a State convention for vague and indefinable purposes. I do not think, however, that a convention can be called in North Carolina unless your State should lead in the movements, and I see many indications of such an intention among your people. I suppose you are aware of my opinions in regard to the danger of such a movement. I expressed them to you by letter last spring, and had the happiness to receive your concurrence in my conclusions then. I regard it as simply another revolution, and by which we would incur, not only the danger attendant upon a disunited confederation, but also of domestic strife and bloodshed, for I have no idea that a severance of our exciting relation could possibly be so unanimously effected as to prevent a considerable minority, backed by the army, from inaugurating