War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1087 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

through the enemy would perhaps attempt a landing above us, and being nearer to Wilmington than me, make a forced march to the city, and at the same time run their boats up the river. To prevent this and to learn their movements more fully I thought it best to send Lipscomb's cavalry and two pieces of artillery to Masonsborough last night. The lights were all extinguished on the fleet last night about 11 o'clock. I think there is some movement on hand. No boats have attempted to come up the river.

Very respectfully, yours,

R. F. HOKE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

Wilmington, January 17, 1865.

Major-General HOKE:

Sugar Loaf:

GENERAL: The commanding general directs me to say that you are authorized to send a flag of truce to the enemy's lines for the purpose of conveying a communication and package for Major-General Whiting. Major Venable will be allowed to accompany the officer charged by you to bear the flag, and in his presence, and under his supervision, to make some verbal inquiries relative to the condition of General Whiting and other officers.

I am, very respectfully, &c.,

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WILMINGTON, January 17, 1865 - 10 p. m.

Major-General HOKE,

Sugar Loaf:

Send information of any passage here till office opens at lee. Boat has been ordered for to-morrow morning.

ARCHR ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Same to Brigadier-General Hebert, Fort Anderson.)

GANDER HALL, January 17, 1865 - 9.30 a. m.

Brigadier-General COLQUITT:

General Bragg desires you to send him as soon as possible a written statement from yourself and staff officers of all you saw and heard at Fort Fisher on Sunday night. This is necessary to enable him to inform the Government.*

Respectfully,

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

---------------

* See Part I, p. 442.

---------------