War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1021 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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the monthly reports of inspection by the sub-district commanders or inspectors. Every command in the department, including posts, will be thoroughly inspected and minutely reported upon at least once a month.

By order of General Bragg:

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Wilmington, January 7, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel A. ANDERSON,

Asst. Adjt. and Insp. General Hdqrs. Dept. of North Carolina:

COLONEL: I regret to have to call the attention of the general commanding to the manner in which troops in this district not under my command are committing trespass and depredation throughout the whole country. Such a state of things has never occurred here before, although at various times I have had a much larger force assembled near the city. The people of this district have heretofore been protected in their farming and property. I have no hesitation in saying that more depredation has been committed in the last ten days by the troops over which I have no control than for the past two years among all the various brigades stationed here, and in which discipline has always been rigidly maintain.d Being at present, by direction of the commanding general, without either the authority or the means to remedy the state of things complained of by Major Reid and by many persons in the vicinity, I respectfully refer his reports to your headquarters.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Wilmington, January 7, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel A. ANDERSON,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Department of North Carolina:

COLONEL: I require for special work a brigade of the supporting force now here to move to Piney Point, two miles and a half west of Smithville. I wish to commence works already designed and approved, and which the troops can readily put up. I doubt an attack by coup de main for some time, at least by confederate Point; but the enemy may readily move by taking their base at Lockwood's Folly. In this case Piney Point is as important, if not more, to the west entrance, than Sugar Loaf to the New Inlet. A few days will be sufficient to place the position I require in a proper condition, at least for sudden emergency. I have no other labor. In case the troops are required elsewhere, they can be readily moved and reach town before the remainder can be got off on the railroad. In the meantime they will be at good work and in a good position.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Major-General.