War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1003 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARTILLERY, Numbers 1.

January 2, 1865.

Cadet N. B. Barnwell, C. S. Army, having reported for orders to the general chief of artillery, under Special Orders, Numbers 309, Adjutant and Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Va., December 30, 1864, is hereby assigned to duty with Colonel H. P. Jones, chief of artillery, Adnerson's corps, as acting adie-de-camp. He will report accordingly.

W. N. PENDLETON,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON'S DIVISION,

January 2, 1865.

Major DUNCAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: Two men deserted to the enemy from Elliott's brigade last night, and one deserter from the enemy came into our lines in front of Gracie's brigade. The following casualties are reported: Ransom's brigade, one killed; Wise's brigade, one killed.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS BUTLER'S CAVALRY DIVISION,

Hicksford, Va., January 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of Northern Virginia:

COLONEL: I have the honor most respectfully and urgently to request that this detachments from this command with Brigadier-General Young in South Carolina be returned to their proper commands. The disorganizing and injurious effect of their being thus separated will be seriously felt in the difficulty of securing the return of a large number of men being sent home with horse details. The odds and ends of regiments detached in this way, without a complement of officers or proper organization, rarely ever accomplish any good, even under the most favorable circumstances, and situated as these men are it is scarcely to be expected that they can be made efficient. The command to which I have been assigned has been detached in every direction by circumstances entirely beyond my control, and I respectfully ask, as an act of justice to myself and to the service, that I be allowed to collect it during this apparent cessation, for the winter, of active hostilities. If it is necessary that any portion of this command be sent to South Carolina I would much prefer, and it would be better for the service, that a regiment or even a brigade be sent instead of this body of disorganized men from all the regiments.

I am, colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. BUTLER,

Major-General.