War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0914 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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CITY POINT, VA., March 10, 1865.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Deserters continue to report the capture of Lynchburg. They also say a report prevails that two bridges on the Danville road north of Burkeville have been destroyed by Union cavalry.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., March 10, 1865.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The following is taken from the Richmond Examiner of to-day:

GOOD NEWS FROM THE VALLEY.

We have some good news from the Valley which it would not be prudent to give in detail at this time. We may say, however, that it is reported that McNeill, Rosser, and Mosby have surrounded the guard who are conducting to Winchester the prisoners taken of Early, and there was a good prospect of their not only recapturing our prisoners, but of also gobbling up the Yankee guard. We shall probably hear of the result of this movement in a day or two. It is said that the enemy have evacuated Staunton. It is reported that during their occupation of the town they did comparatively little injury, except in the way of burning Government stores and supplies.

FROM GRANT'S LINES.

All continues quiet along the lines about Richmond. Grant is evidently waiting upon the result other movements that are going on before he attempts and advance. The weather, too, forbids any movement by Grant at this time. The roads are deep in mud, and it will require a spell of good weather before the country is dry enough to admit of moving artillery. Both armies are mud-bound.

CLEARING OUT THE YANKEE PRISONERS.

Yesterday the flag-of-truce steamer carried down to Varina between 500 and 600 sick and wounded Yankee prisoners gathered from the Richmond hospitals. This morning the residue of well prisoners held in Richmond, about 900, will be forwarded to the exchange ground. Up to last evening no order had been received by Major Turner, Libby commandant, to include Generals Crook and Kelley in the shipment, but it was supposed they would go.

From the Sentinel:

FROM FREDERICKSBURG.

A gentleman from Fredericksburg informs us that the enemy arrived there Monday and left Tuesday evening. There were eight steamers-three gun-boats and five transports. The forces consisted of about 3,000 infantry and 300 or 400 cavalry. The commander of the expedition stated that he was ordered by General Grant to proceed to Fredericksburg and bring off or destroy a quantity of tobacco which was about to be illegally traded for. The officer in command said the troops were from the north of the James, and seemed to be surprised when the permit to trade for the tobacco was shown him, signed by Lincoln. They removed and destroyed a large amount of tobacco and burned twenty-eight cars. The other loss to the railroad was trifling. They captured three returned prisoners, destroyed the contents of one store, carried away a few negroes, and took off with their own consent two or three citizens. They also captured a number of wagons and about fifty mules. The citizens were not badly treated, nor were any of them arrested. Six Yankee deserters came down in last evening traink, and it is said the enemy's loss by desertion was over 100.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.