War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0886 N. AND SE. VA., N.C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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I believe I gave Hughes a card putting him with Singleton on the same letter. However this many be, I now authorize you to get Singleton and Hughes away from Richmond if you choose and can. I also authorize you by an order, or in what form you choose, to suspend all operations on the Treasury trade permits in all places southeastward of the Alleghanies. If you make such orders, notify me of it, giving a copy, so that I can give corresponding direction to the Navy.

A. LINCOLN.

CITY POINT, VA., March 8, 1865-11 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

I believe General Singleton should be ordered to return from Richmond, and all permits he may have should be revoked. Our friends in Richmond, and we have many of them there, send word that tobacco is being exchanged on the Potomac for bacon, and they believe Singleton to be at the bottom of it. I am also of the opinion that all permits issued to Judge Hughes should be canceled. I think the same of all other permits heretofore granted. But in the case of Singleton and Judge Hughes, I believe there is a deep laid plan for making millions, and they will sacrifice every interest of the country to succeed. I do not know Hughes personally, never having seen him but once, but the conviction here expressed is forced upon me.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., March 8, 1865-11.30 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

We have got supplies going out by Norfolk to the rebel army stopped, but information received shows that large amounts still go by way of the Blackwater. They no doubt go on the Treasury permits heretofore given under the act of Congress regulating trade with States in insurrection. I would respectfully recommend that orders be sent to the Army and Navy everywhere to stop all supplies going to the interior, and annulling all permits for such trade heretofore given.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 8, 1865-9.30 p.m.

(Received 9th.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point:

In reply to your telegram in respect to trade with the enemy, I am unable to control the influences that procure permits, but I understand that the President's passes and permits are subject to your authority as commander-in-chief, and that, notwithstanding any permit given by the Secretary of the Treasury or President himself you as commander may absolutely prohibit trade through your lines and may seize goods in their transit either way, and may also prohibit individuals crossing your lines. This, I understand, the effect of the instruction given you