War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0854 N. AND SE. VA., N.C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

March 5, 1865.

General EMORY,

Stephenson's Depot:

Dispatches from General Grant state positively that General Sheridan captured General Early and nearly his entire force, about 1,800 men, between Staunton and Charlottesville on Thursday last. The information comes from several different sources.

C. H. MORGAN,

Brevet Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

(Same to General Stevenson, Harper's Ferry, and General Carroll, Cumberland.)

CONFIDENTIAL.] HDQRS. MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

March 5, 1865.

Major-General EMORY,

Commanding Nineteenth Corps:

GENERAL: Major-General Hancock instructs me to say that he proposes to move his headquarters to Cumberland to-morrow. An order will be issued placing you in command of all the troops along the line of the military railroad and at Winchester; they will however, be borne on the returns as they now are. The objects to be attained are to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the depots on this side of the Potomac, and to obtain early and accurate information of any movements of the enemy. The general is not a liberty to permit at this time any essential change in the disposition of the troops, unless compelled by necessity.

Aside from your own corps, there are about 1,600 effective cavalry under General Chapman's command (General Torbert being temporarily absent), and about 600 cavalry under General Stevenson's command, at Charlestown (Colonel Reno's regiment). There is a regiment of infantry 800 strong (First Regiment, First Corps, Lieutenant-Colonel Bird commanding) at the point where the Shenandoah and railroad separate. There is also a regiment of infantry at Halltown.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. MORGAN,

Brevet Brigadier-General of Volunteers and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

March 5, 1865

Major-General EMORY,

Commanding Nineteenth Corps:

GENERAL: Major-General Hancock directs me to say that, until the present uncertainty concerning General Sheridan's movements is dispelled, he desires the military situation here to remain unchanged. He proposes, however, in the event of certain contingencies, to take up a new line, somewhat as follows: An advanced post at the crossing of the Opequon by the railroad for the purpose of holding the bridge. Major Stewart, of the engineers, will to-morrow locate a block-house capable of holding, say, 150 men. The general wishes you to complete