War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0836 N. AND SE.VA., W.VA.,MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON, TWENTY-SECOND ARMY CORPS, Washington, D. C., March 4, 1865-3.25 p.m.

General GAMBLE,

Commanding at Fairfax Court-House:

Have you received Colonel Taylor's dispatch enjoining increased vigilance on your line?

C. C. AUGUR,

Major-General.

FAIRFAX COURT-HOUSE, March 4, 1865. [Received 4.35 p.m.]

General AUGUR:

GENERAL: Your telegram just received. Colonel Taylor's telegram received, and answered promptly at the time. All vigilant and in constant readiness on the line.

W. GAMBLE,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS SEPARATE BRIGADE, Fairfax Court-House, Va., March 4, 1865-7.30 p.m. [Received 8.50 p.m.]

Major-General AUGUR,

Commanding Department of Washington:

GENERAL: I sent out two scouts-one beyond Centerville, the other beyond Chantily. Both have returned, and no enemy seen. All are under arms from dark to daylight. Pickets round the posts are doubled.

W. GAMBLE,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS, March 4, 1865.

[Major-General HANCOCK:]

MY DEAR GENERAL: The case of Stevenson, which you cite in your note, if I understand you, is not applicable to the present one. A day or two before it was known Crook was captured I applied to return to my own headquarters, and General Sheridan told me, "No; I am going off in a day or two, and I do not known how long I am to stay, and you must stay here to take command" - that is, of the Army of the Shenandoah. When Stevenson was sent above by him that was still the case; besides which, General Sheridan was confident that Crook would escape or be rescued. I have telegraphed twice to Dwight, and no response. My scouts [two unpaid soldiers] report to me that the guerillas have constant communication between Spring Creek and Smithfield, both about eleven miles in my rear. Smithfield is on the other side of Apple Pie Ridge, and there is no picket between that and the enemy. Smithfield has at this time an unusual number of unarmed citizens. If I had cavalry I should have both places, particularly the