War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0793 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY, March 2, 1865.

Brigadier-General FORSYTH,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: There are two or three surgeons among the prisoners whom I wish to parole that they may take care of their own wounded. Is there any objection, and which is the form of parole? Captain Wallace, of my staff, has just come from the front, and reports another wagon train captured over the mountains and coming toward us.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. MERRITT,

Brevet Major-General.

FIELD ORDERS,

WAYNESBOROUGH, VA., Numbers 4.

March 2, 1865.

A force to consist of one regiment from each brigade, the regiments to average not less than 150 men, will move to the rear, via Staunton, to-morrow morning early, with the prisoners and captures. The commanding officer of the Third Division will detail a field officer, not lower in rank than a lieutenant-colonel, to command this force. One of the best officers in the division will be selected for this important duty. He will be ordered to report to these headquarters, for special instructions, at 4 a. m. to-morrow. The dismounted men of the commands will be out of the column and accompany the force detailed above. Each division commander will detail a staff officer to attend to the organization of the force from his command, and to see that it is properly started on the march.

By command of Brevet Major-General Merritt:

J. SPREADBURY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY,

MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION, Numbers 1.

Staunton, Va., March 2, 1865.

The main object at this time is to preserve the horses of the command. Every exertion must be made to do this. Division commanders are reminded that it is impossible, under the circumstances, to issue elaborate orders to cover all exigencies. Officers must use their best judgment and energies in conducting the movement of the column. Every exertion must be made to procure forage for our horses. This matter is paramount to every other. Officers will take unusual care to prevent men from abusing their horses by galloping and trotting them when unnecessary. Commanding officers who conduct the march of a column will move slowly, accommodating the march to the character of the roads. The strength of the horses of the command, as well as that of the animals of the supply train, in which all have an interest, must be husbanded. It is thought that all officers and men feel and will take a proper interest in these matters.

By command Brevet Major-General Merritt:

J. SPREADBURY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.