War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0782 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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mended General Crocker for that place, but I believe he has not been ordered in from New Mexico. I wanted that done last fall and supposed until a few days since that he had been ordered in. Is there not a great mistake in keeping a large number of cavalrymen posted through the city of Washington? It seems to me one-half the force of cavalry in the department is wasted in duties in no way tending to the protection of the place. I may be mistaken, and only call attention to see whether this is not so. At this time, not until the roads get good, do I think there is the slightest danger of the enemy attempting to blockade the Potomac. They have not got the artillery horses nor men to spare for such an enterprise. On the whole, I think there is not the slightest need of apprehension, except from a dash of a few mounted men into Alexandria, and with proper watchfulness this ought not to occur.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., March 2, 1865-8.30 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The reports show in Department of Washington 24,442 effective men, and Department of West Virginia 13,946, exclusive of one division of Nineteenth Corps, and 2,000 effective mounted cavalry left by Sheridan. The rebels are receiving many valuable supplies from Northern cities by the Fredericksburg road, no doubt, and necessarily picket the Rappahannock to protect this traffic. Colonel Wells or General Augur should find out what force there is on the Rappahannock. I shall clear out that country as soon as transports can be got to move the men and it stops raining for a day or two.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WASHINGTON, March 2, 1865-9.30 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Have you sent any force toward the Rappahannock? If Lee has made any detachment in that direction would it not be easy for him to put batteries on the Potomac to intercept transports, or even move on Alexandria and destroy the depots there? Past disasters from stripping this department of troops repeatedly have made me very solicitous in this matter and apprehensive of a surprise in our defenseless condition. It is a hazard to which the national capital should not again be exposed.

E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CITY POINT, VA., March 2, 1865-10.30 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

My dispatch of this afternoon answers yours of 9.30 this evening. I do not think it possible for Lee to send anything toward Washington, unless it should be a brigade of cavalry. Augur's returns show a good force of cavalry to meet anything of the kind, besides a large infantry force. The great number of deserters and refugees coming in