War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0733 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

February 28, 1865.

Brevet Major-General WEBB:

These three men belong to General B. Johnson's division. The troops are being massed on the extreme right of their army. They are expecting an attack from our side. The cars are loaded with heavy ammunition, and are sending away some cotton and burning some. The 8-inch columbiad is not taken away from Cemetery Hill. Three more have just arrived from the same division as those, and corroborate the above. They also state that General Lee had gone to Charlotte. The mortar battery, opened this evening, has been erected some time; it contains two large and two small mortars.

ROBT. B. POTTER,

Brevet Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

February 28, 1865. (Received 10.45 a.m.)

Bvt. Major General A. S. WEBB,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

The enemy opened last evening with mortars from a new position on City Point Railroad, opposite Battery 9. Very few deserters; too thick to see much of the enemy's line this morning.

ROBT. B. POTTER,

Brevet Major-General.

FEBRUARY 28, 1865.-4.10 p.m.

Brigadier General JOHN A. RAWLINS,

City Point:

Twenty-five deserters from the enemy since my last report.

JNO. W. TURNER,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

U. S. FLAG-SHIP DUMBARTON,

February 28, 1865.

Lieutenant-General GRANT, U. S. Army,

City Point, Va.:

The barges were sunk as soon as they arrived at the place designated.

WM. RADFORD,

Commander, Commanding Naval Forces.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

February 28, 1865.

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

I do not think Winchester a suitable place for my headquarters for several reasons. It is an extreme outpost, and I am necessarily involved here with a multitude of details properly belonging to the post commander. Martinsburg seems to me to be a more suitable place, and of more importance than seems to be thought. I do not, in fact, see the importance of holding Winchester as an infantry post, if