War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0730 N. AND SE. VA., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

February 28, 1865. (Received 11.10 a.m.)

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

COLONEL: One lieutenant and seven men came in last night from the enemy; furnished no information.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

February 28, 1865. (Received 1.05 p.m.)

Major-General WEBB,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The officer who deserted into the lines of the Second Corps since the morning report was made (four privates have likewise come in since) states that Heth the intrenchments as far as Hatcher's Run; that he understands that Mahone's division has been moved recently to the vicinity of Hatcher's Run, where they are throwing up intrenchments; that the two divisions of Gordon's corps remain in rear of their right. He is an intelligent man, and gave me some facts concerning their troops in the movement to Hatcher's Run on the 5th instant which are interesting. His statements corroborate those previously made by deserters upon that subject, and appear to be authentic.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,

February 28, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel C. A. WHITTIER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Army Corps:

COLONEL: During the absence of Major-General Meade, commanding the Army of the Potomac, Major-General Parke issued an order to have one-tenth of this command kept under arms every night, and a field officer is detailed as per order of corps headquarters to see that this order is strictly obeyed, which is done regularly. I would respectfully call the attention of the major-general commanding Second Army Corps to the matter, and submit to his consideration if it would be inconsistent with the exigencies of the service to apply for the suspension of said orders. Our picket-line is very strong, and at such a distance in front of our lines that no attack could be made by the enemy without leaving full time to the regiments to take position in arms behind the breast-works. Our intrechments are formidable and protected by two lines of abatis, swept in every direction by our artillery. A strong guard in each regiment would attain the same object as the tenth of each of them now ordered out every night, and the revocation of the orders, without impairing our defense, would relieve greatly our men, who had a hard service to do for the three last weeks.

Respectfully submitted.

R. DE TROBRIAND,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.