War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0669 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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ceedings in the Senate hill for raising 200,000 negro troops. It appears that on Tuesday last the bill was lost by a vote of 11 to 10. In official circles this is considered as finally disposing of the question of putting negroes into the army.

The House negro soldier bill, which is very similar to the Senate bill, has not been and as now believed will not be, acted upon by the Senate.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., February 24, 1865-5 p. m.

Hon E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

Has any assignment been made to the command of the Department of West Virginia? Is not Hartsuff a suitable man to take Kelley's place? I do not know him myself.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, February 24, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding Armies of the United States, City Point, Va.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the Secretary of War to transmit for your consideration the inclosed extract from a recent letter submitted to the War Department by the Honorable Thomas Ewing, father-in-law of Major-General Sherman, and father of Brigadier Gens. Hugh and Thomas Ewing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. A. DANA,

Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

Numbers 12 NORTH A STREET, February 22, 1865.

MY DEAR SIR: * * * Suppose Lee should determine to abandon Richmond where will he go? Will he not march his whole force upon Washington, leaving only enough for pickets and to amuse Grant and disguise his own movements? Is Washington so well guarded that it will resist the first onslaught? He could not hold it, but he might hope something from temporary possession of the capital and insignia of sovereignty; and at any rate, if he fell, to fall with eclat; and, indeed, he might hope to arouse the dormant energies of Northern sympathizers by so bold a stroke, if successful even for a day. It is a contingency to be guarded against. Indeed, I do not know what else remains to him that will not involve disgraceful defeat and surrender.

I am, very truly, yours,

T. EWING.

CITY POINT, VA., February 24, 1865.

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C.:

Please order Lieutenant Colonel J. B. Howard, chief quartermaster Twenty-fourth Army Corps, to report at once to Major-General Ord for duty in the field. He is now on an examining board. His services are much needed.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.