War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0628 Chapter LVIII. N. AND. SE. VA., W. VA., AND PA.

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they had taken proper precautions, and the neglect has been the fault of some one else. I think Humphreys will prove one of our best corps commanders, hence I would not care to have him leave here. I asked General Halleck some time since to order Crocker from New Mexico. If he is within reach I scarcely know his equal to take Crook's place. If he cannot be reached I will name some one else, probably Terry, who from the number of division commanders with Schofield's army ranking him, is occupying an unimportant position.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., February 22, 1865-11 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

All points on the coast now being taken from the rebels except Mobile (if Wilmington is not now in our possession it will be within forty-eight hours, I think) makes me believe that the French rebel rams will go to Mobile Bay to cut off our troops there from supplies. I have good reason to believe orders have gone from Richmond to hold Mobile at all hazards. This strengthens this theory. These rams may have started for a different destination, but as they will likely stop at some port near our coast to till up with coal and supplies they ca get final orders. I think it advisable to notify the Navy Department and Canby of this theory so they can prepare for it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., February 22, 1865.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The following items are taken from to-day's Richmond papers:

Our readers will cheerfully forego their desires to be apprised of the pending military movements in the Carolina when they are informed that our reticence is in compliance with wishes which have been communicated to all the newspapers.

A report comes from Southwestern Virginia that Gillem, with 4,500 Yankees, is advancing into upper Easyt Tennessee, their advances being now north of Greenville. It is believed to be their intention to try and occupy the whole of the State at the time of the coming election.

Gilmore's brigade of Kentucky cavalry had an engagement last Saturday at Ball's Brigade, in Lee Country, Va, twenty-five miles north of Cumberland Gap, resulting in a splending victory to our arms. Out loss was not over sixty killed and wounded.

Rumors can no more be stopped from circulation than sparks from going upward.

There may be some truth in every rumor, but it is hardly probable that a tithe of what one hears has really any foundation in fast. They start nobody knows where or how, but every one helps them on with more or less of amplification, until, like the snow-ball, which was once easily handled, and even cast one to another, it has, by continual accretions, grown to such gigantic proportions as to tax the strength of the whole community to send up under it. By one man Beauregard is reported to have gone crazy, mind very much the worse for wear, body dragged down by great exertion; by another, he has asked to be relieved; by a third, Sherman is between Beauregard and Charlotte; and by another, the devil is to pay generally and the Confederacy is gone up. Put not your faith in rumor, and do not permit yourselves to be very much frightened.

THE NEGRO SOLDIERS BILL.

Yesterday, during the consideration in secret session by the Confederate of the bill to raise 200,000 negro soldiers, a motion was made for its indefinite postponement, which was agreed to by a majority of one. This is equivalent to laying it on