War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0494 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

February 8, 1865-9.30 a. m.

Major-General GREGG,

Commanding Cavalry:

When joined by the other brigade of your cavalry you are directed by the major-general commanding to send two brigades to their old camp, leaving one to watch the Halifax road. You will relieve the infantry picket from the Halifax road toward the James.

ALEX. S. WEBB,

Brevet Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

February 8, 1865-6.30 p. m.

Bvt. Major General A. S. WEBB,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have just received a report from the commander of the brigade of cavalry on the Halifax road that the infantry picket-line is established to that road on the west side, and the cavalry line to the same place on the east side. It is very necessary that my horses be fed hay. Will you please inform me if the brigade will be relieved, now to it in its present position?

Respectfully, yours,

D. MCM. GREGG,

Brevet Major-General of Volunteers, Commanding Second Division.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

February 8, 1865.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

COLONEL: I have the honor to inform you that I received official notification from the Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, of the acceptance of my resignation. Bvt. Brigadier General J. Irvin Gregg is the senior officer present, and reports himself for duty.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. MCM. GREGG,

Brevet Major-General of Volunteers, Commanding Second Division.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

February 8, 1865-12.20 p. m.

Major-General ORD:

All quiet our left. On the 5th I moved out with the cavalry, Fifth Corps, and two divisions of Second Corps. The cavalry occupied Dinwiddie Court-House, captured a train of twenty-five wagons, and inflicted all the injury possible. The Fifth Crops took position at Armstrong's Mill, on Hatcher's Run, and were attacked about 5 p. m. by portions of Hill's and Gordon's corps. The attack was handsomely repulsed and enemy severely punished. In the night the cavalry and