War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0469 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

February 7, 1865.

Colonel H. CAPEHART:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs me to notify you that a party of guerrillas, twenty or twenty-five strong, are reported looking about the left of your line. He desires that you will notify your pickets to be especially vigilant and on the alert, particularly on the left of the line.

Respectfully,

WILL RUMSEY,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

Winchester, February 7, 1865.

Major General GEORGE CROOK,

Cumberland:

From papers taken from Harry Gilmor it appears he had had a rough time with Woodson's and McNeill's men. He says in a letter that they are in a state of mutiny, and had dispersed; that he arrested one of the commanding officer, but that he would not recognize the arrest, and calls on some officer from Warren County to hurry over with his company and help him. One paper also says the Swamp Dragons must be let alone.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, MD., February 7, 1865.

General JOHN D. STEVENSON:

Our company is having great difficulty now with owners of coal shipped over the road, from the frequent depredations made upon the cars by the soldier along the line, as well as others. May we not ask you to issue such orders as will, in some measure, arrest this evil. Our accounts with all shippers of coal are greatly complicated, and much difficulty experienced from this cause.

W. P. SMITH.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., February 7, 1865-12.53 p. m.

Major-General DIX,

New York:

Mr. Foote, late member of the rebel Congress, having come within our lines, and not being willing to return to Richmond, the President permits him to go out of the jurisdiction of the United States by way of New York. He is now on his way under guard, as a prisoner, from General Sheridan's command, with orders to be turned over to you. On his arrival you will take charge of him, keep him under guard, permit no communication between himself and others, except by your leave, and place him on board any vessel he may choose, to go beyond the jurisdiction of the United States.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.