War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0417 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

February 6, 1865-7.15 a.m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

Major-General Warren and Humphreys have both telegraphed me this morning and informed me of their being in position, their right, well supported, near Fort Cummings, and two divisions of the Fifth Corps over Hatcher's Run forming their left. Gregg's cavalry is now with Warren. Trains all came up the Vaughan road. I have telegraphed to them to move out at once, to determine whether or not Hill's or any portion of the enemy's force is now outside of their line of works. In case any should be found they are to be driven in. Heth charged in two lines and was badly repulsed. Subsequently the whole of Hill's corps participated in the attack. The above is the report of the deserters.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HATCHER'S RUN, February 6, 1865-1 p.m.

(Received 2.25 p.m.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Humphreys' reconnaissance shows the enemy to have retired within his main line of works, leaving his dead on the field, now being buried by us. Warren, across Hatcher's Run, is now moving out to feel the enemy. Deserters say their line now passes through Dabney's Mill to Gravelly Run, and it is probable Warren will find them in their line. If they are outside he will attack; if, however, they are not so found, your instructions will be required, as I have accomplished all originally designed or now practicable. The condition of the roads very bad, and want of trains and supplies precludes any extended movement to the left. It remains, therefore, either to intrench where we are or withdraw. If these partial movements are contemplated it would probably be well to extend our entrenched line to Hatcher's Run, as this then would be point of departure, and we would be nearer to threaten the enemy's line of communications on the Boydton plank road; at the same time the enemy, would, without doubt, extend their line, overlapping us, as they have done each time we extended. Your views and orders are desired.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., February 6, 1865-2.50 p.m.

(Received 3 p.m.)

Major-General MEADE,

Hatcher's Run:

I would not recommend making any attack against entrenched lines, but I think it will be well to hold out to Hatcher's Run. It will give us a better change for covering future movements, and when we do start we will entirely abandon all extension beyond our present lines. Please inform me about what our casualties have been and what you think have been those of the enemy.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

27 R R-VOL XLVI, PT II