War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0182 N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS FIRST SEPARATE BRIGADE,

Fairfax Court-House, Va., January 19, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel J. H. TAYLOR,

Chief of Staf, Department of Washington:

Captain Lawrence, brigade quartermaster, reports that while his wagon train with hay was returning from about ten miles outside of this post yesterday, the rear guard of the train was fired into from a skirt of woods by a party of Mosby's men. The rear guard immediately returned the fire with their carbiness, when the rebels scampered off through the woods. To-day the inhabitants there report that three of the rebels were badly wounded by the carbines of the guard - Eighth Illinois Cavalry. None of our men or horses hurt.

W. GAMBLE,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

BALTIMORE, MD., January 19, 1865.

General J. D. STEVENSON:

Do you think it desirable or requisite to have a guard on the express train to-night between Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry? Do you think the road injured by the parties making the raid last night?

W. P. SMITH.

HARPER'S FERRY, January 19, 1865.

W. P. SMITH,

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad:

I sent to-day a heavy cavalry force to Bunker Hill in pursuit of raiders, to remain to-night on road near Duffiel's. I do not think a train guard necessary. The damage done is reported to be light.

JOHN D. STEVENSON,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF HARPER'S FERRY,

Harper's Ferry, Va., January 19, 1865.

Colonel M. A. RENO,

Commanding Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry:

COLONEL: A party of rebel guerrillas, dressed in our uniform, took up a rail last night on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad about one mile and a half east of Duffield's, throwing a freight train off the track, which they attempted to burn. It is supposed they came in by way of Bunker Hill and Smithfield and retired by same route. I wish you during the day to send out a scout of 100 men, under a good officer, to Smithfield, and scout down through timber from there to Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, down to brown's Cross-Roads and Duffield's, staying in that vicinity and learning all they can of the party, where it came from, and in what direction they retired. I think the scout had better remain near Duffield's to-night, unless they get positive information that they have left the country. I think you had better establish a system of patrolling from your camp to Baltimore and Ohio Railroad as far up as Kearnsville,