War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0157 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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quiet as a Sabbath day, the dead were being buried, and the wounded collected and placed in transports and field hospitals. General Sherman renewed the movement of his forces from Savannah last week. The Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps went in transports to Beaufort. Saturday, January 14, the Seventeenth Corps, under Major-General Blair, crossed Port Royal Ferry, and, with a portion of General Foster's command, moved on Pocotaligo. General Howard, commanding that wrong of the army, reported on Sunday that "the enemy abandoned his torng works in our front during Saturday night. General Blair's corps now occupy a strong position across the railroad and covering all the approaches eastward to pocotaligo." Al the sick of General Sherman's army are in good hospitals at Beaufort and Hilton Head, where the genial climate affords advantages for recovery superior to any other place. The peace and order prevailing at Savannah since its occupation by General Sherman's army could not be surpassed. Few male inhabitants are to be seen in the streets; ladies and children evince a since of security;no instance of disorder or personal injury or insult has occurred; laboring men and mechanics, white and black, are seeking employment. The troops are cheerfully and respectful toward everyone, and seem to fell themselves as much at home and on good behavior as if in their native towns. Trade is restricted for the present to actual military necessity. Many ships with merchandise from the North are waiting at Hilton Head permission to go to Savannah, but General Sherman has admitted only a limited quantity of supplies required by his troops. A mistake prevailers at the North as to the present inducements for commerce at Savannah. There is not yet any large population to be supplied, no credit, or money, no commodities for exchange, and there can be no great amount for a considerable period. All the cotton and products now within Savannah belong to the Government as captured property. Stringent precautions against supplies that might go to the enemy have been made, and will be enforced by General Sherman. The cotton captured in Savannah, of which there is a good deal of Sea Island, has been turned over by the quartermaster to Mr. Draper, special agent of the Treasury. The Quartermaster-General remains at Savannah to execute the arrangements for its shipment.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

FORTRESS MONROE, January 17, 1865 - 10 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point:

I have just arrived from Savannah, having stopped six hours yesterday at Fort Fisher. My telegram to the President,* a copy of which goes with this, gives the particulars learned from Admiral Porter and General Terry, also the movements of General Sherman's force. I staid with Sherman four days, and would be glad to see you so as to communicate some other matters that cannot safely be written, but am too unwell to go to city Point, if you can come here. At General Sherman's request North carolina was put in the department of the South and added to his command. General Townsend will send you a copy of the order. Please let me know if I shall wait here to see you.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

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* See next, ante.

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