War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0125 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

January 13, 1865.

Brigadier-General FORSYTH,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I send battery to Winchester to-morrow at 7 p.m. The train, &c., will be ready to start in the other direction at 9 a.m.

W. H. EMORY,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

January 13, 1865.

Major WILLIAM RUSSELL, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Cavalry Corps:

MAJOR: In obedience to instructions, I sent out yesterday morning a reconnaissance, consisting of 200 men from the Cavalry Reserve Brigade, under Major Arch. McKendry, Second Massachusetts Cavalry, as far as Strasburg. We found nothing there, and the inhabitants reported that no force of the enemy, save a few rebel scouts, had been there for some weeks. There was nothing at Fisher's Hill. It was reported that the rebel cavalry, except a few squadrons, were dismounted, the horses being sent to the rear for forage. The roads were in fair condition. No pickets were seen, and the party returned safely last night. The report of the party that went to Fort Royal is herewith inclosed. They saw nothing, and were unable to cross the river.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. GIBBS,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding Division.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION, No. 7. Camp Averell, Va., January 13, 1865.

THE OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION:

COMRADES: The time of our separation is at land. No one regrets the existence of the cause that necessitates the act more than I. On leaving the division allow me to assure you that I shall ever cherish your memory with fond recollections. Our associations have been of the most pleasant character. In the administration of the affairs of the division I have at all times endeavored to keep in view but one object-i.e., the good of the service, regardless of personal popularity; the faithful have been rewarded, and the indolent and inefficient have been punished, as far as in my power.

To the Second Brigade of the division, now command by Colonel H. Capehart, formerly commanded by me from the 10th of June, 1864, to the 24th day of September, 1864, at which time I assumed command of the division, I owe much of my success as an officer, for which it has my thanks. To the division as a whole I can say with great pleasure that through the unparalleled, active, and successful campaign in the Shenandoah Valley success has crowned all our efforts; may I not hope that such may characterize all your efforts in the future.

Hoping that the reputation which as a division you have gained may be preserved untarnished, and that in all changes through which you may be called to pass harmony may prevail in the organization, I bid you farewell.

W. H. POWELL,

Brigadier-General.