War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0122 N. AND SE.VA., N.C., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

ARMY OF THE JAMES,

In the Field, January 13, 1865-10.30 a.m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

I shall be glad if you can send Gibbon to the Twenty-fourth at once.

E. O. C. ORD,

Major-General, Volunteers.

BEFORE WILMINGTON, N. C., January 13, 1865.

(Via Fort Monroe 7 p.m. 15th.)

Brigadier-General RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff, City Point:

GENERAL: We arrived here last night and disembarked to-day, getting the infantry on shore at 3 p.m. Our ammunition is landed, and most of the stores. We hold a line across the point from the Flag-Pond Battery, but it is not a good one, and probably will have to be changed during the night. As soon as the line is determined upon I shall fortify it. To-morrow I intend to move down troops under cover of the navy fire and determine whether an assault is advisable. Prisoners and deserters report that Hoke's division is here, or that three brigades are here. A portion of the ammunition in the men's boxes was spoiled in getting through the surg. Please send me 300,000 rounds of caliber .58. I think that fifty wagons and teams should also be sent down; they will be useful in any event.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALFRED H. TERRY,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding Expedition.

HEADQUARTERS EXPEDITIONARY FORCES,

Before Wilmington, N. C., January 13, 1865.

Brigadier General JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff, City Point, Va.:

GENERAL: After consultation with Colonel Comstock, and in view of what I think is the ascertained fact, that the whole, or nearly the whole, of Hoke's forces is still here, I think that it would be advisable to send the balance of the troops which Lieutenant-General Grant spoke of sending forward. It seems indispensable to hold strongly the line toward Wilmington, and for this purpose at least four of my brigades are necessary, leaving only two brigades for operations against the fort. In case an assault should be tried and be unsuccessful, the losses which would be incurred would leave an entirely insufficient force for further operations. I suggest that these troops should be sent in vessels capable of standing a storm at their anchors here, and should be provisioned, coaled, and watered for at least fifteen days, so that in case the weather should prevent the landing of supplies for more troops than we now have, they could remain on the vessels.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALFRED H. TERRY,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding Expedition.

P. S.-Please send me twenty paulins to cover stores and ammunition.

A. H. TERRY,

Brevet Major-General.