War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 0014 N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS, January 2, 1865.

(Received 9.25 p. m.)

General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Nothing of importance to report for the last twenty-four hours.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.

HDQRS. SIXTH ARMY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, January 2, 1865.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have the honor to call the attention of the major-general commanding to the present disposition of the artillery of the corps, and to suggest the necessity of making some additions thereto. The corps artillery, consisting at this time of seven batteries, is at present distributed along the line of intrenchments, thirty-six guns being posted in the front line from Battery 24 to Fort Conahey, and one section of two guns in Fort Davison in the rear line, leaving nothing in the shape of artillery as a reserve. It is expected, I presume, that the artillery of the Fifth Corps will serve as a reserve in case of need, but, from its location, I feel satisfied that it could not be brought up and placed in battery in less than an hour to meet an attack upon me. It is readily conceivable that, in view of the close proximity of the enemy's lines to our own, the presence of reserve batteries might be of the greatest value, much within the time required for the Fifth Corps artillery to get on the ground, and I would therefore recommend that at least two six-gun batteries, in addition to what I now have, be assigned me, to be held in reserve near the center of the Sixth Corps line. I would also suggest that two of the batteries which were with the corps in the Valley, and which have become identified with it by long service, are now at Camp Barry, and that if the desired artillery cannot be readily supplied from this army, I should be glad to get them back to the corps. They are G, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, and the First New York Independent Battery.

I have brought this general subject already one before the major-general commanding, but the belief that he is not fully aware of the present disposition of the guns and the importance, in my judgment, of having some reserve artillery, induces me to again present it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

ARTILLERY HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, January 2, 1865.

Colonel C. H. TOMPKINS,

Chief of Artillery, Sixth Corps:

COLONEL: Battery H, First Rhode Island Artillery, has been ordered to your brigade. This increase of artillery under your command is intended to enable you to place a section in the new work on your front and to relieve the section of Brown's battery, belonging to Second Corps, that occupies the work in your rear line. It is not intended