War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 1323 Chapter LVIII. OPERATIONS IN THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY, VA.

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labor than was justifiable under the circumstances (as I was under orders to return within ten days and was then very short of forage). The correspondence between Colonel Thompson and myself you will please find inclosed.

On Tuesday, May 2, I left Staunton, and arrived at my camp in this place this morning.

During my journey up the Valley upward of 900 soldiers belonging to the Army of Northern Virginia were paroled at different points by Captain Snyder, acting assistant provost-marshal-general.

I remain, major, very respectfully, you obedient servant,

H. B. REED,

Colonel, Commanding Twenty-second New York Cavalry.

Major WILLIAM RUSSELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

HEADQUARTERS JACKSON'S BRIGADE, April 30, 1865.

OFFICER COMMANDING U. S. FORCES AT STAUNTON:

I send Captain G. W. Silcott, acting assistant adjutant-general, with a flag of truce to ascertain upon what terms the U. S. authorities will accept the surrender of the troops under my command; and to that end I respectfully ask an interview, at such point as you may designate, to arrange the terms, or for me to decide whether they ought to be accepted or not. If they are not accepted. I am sure that the U. S. authorities will not attempt to interfere with myself or the troops under my command until they have at least five hours' notice ofthe disposition on the part of the U. S. forces to attempt mine and their capture; and I respectfully ask that such assurance be given me.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. P. THOMPSON,

Colonel Nineteenth Virginia Cavalry, Commanding, &c.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Staunton, Va., April 30, 1865.

Colonel W. P. THOMPSON,

Commanding Jackson's Brigade, Lomax's Division, &c.:

COLONEL: I have had the honor to receive at the hands of Captain Silcott, with flag of truce, a communication for you asking upon what terms you can surrender troops under your command. I beg to say in reply, that the United States Government will receive your command upon the same terms given to the Army of Northern Virginia, viz, officers and men to give their parole of honor not to take up arms against the United States until exchanged; all arms, horses, and public property to be turned over to the United States, officers to retain their side-arms, private horses, and personal baggage.

I have the honor to remain, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. B. REED,

Colonel, Twenty-second New York Cav., Commanding U. S. Forces at Staunton.