War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 1177 Chapter LVIII. THE APPOMATTOX CAMPAIGN.

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Captain C. W. Wells, One hundred and eighteenth New York Volunteers, to be brevet major for gallant and distinguished services during the late campaign.

First Lieutenant J. F. Streeter, Fortieth Massachusetts Volunteers, to be brevet captain for faithful services during the late campaign.

Captain H. A. Vezin, Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry, to be brevet major for gallant and distinguished services during the late campaign.

Captain Charles E. Thomas, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, to be brevet major for gallant and distinguished services during the late campaign.

First Lieutenant Sheldon Leavitt, jr., Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, to be brevet captain for gallant and distinguished services during the late campaign.

All to date from the 9th of April, 1865, the day of the surrender of Lee's army .

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN GIBBON,

Major-General of Volunteers, Commanding Corps.

No. 220. Report of Lieutenant Frederick J. Amsden, Signal Corps, U. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS SIGNAL DETACHMENT, 24TH ARMY CORPS,

Richmond, Va., May 1, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following report for the month of April, 1865:

The headquarters signal detachment, consisting of myself and three enlisted men, increased on the 10th to five, had been with the headquarters Twenty-fourth Army Corps in all its movements during the month . If I had been allowed to take more of my detachment when the campaign opened it could have been used very efficiently.

On the 1st I was placed in charge of the signal station near the ruins of the Armstrong, house, headquarters First Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps, where we remained until the next morning, when, our troops having broken the enemy's line in front, I moved the station with headquarters Twenty-fourth Army Corps. Our forces pressed on toward Petersburg, and the Twenty-fourth Army Corps, by a desperate assault, captured Forts Gregg and Baldwin, in the enemy's interior line of works. Headquarters were established at a house near by on the Boydton plank road, where I established a signal station, connecting with the Army of the Potomac signal tower, on the old front of the Sixth Army Corps. The next morning (3rd) the enemy evacuated Petersburg, and the Twenty-fourth Army Corps immediately moved on the Cox road, down the South Side Railroad, toward Burkeville Junction, passed through Sutherland's Station, and bivouacked for the night about three miles beyond. Here I discovered a train of cars farther down the railroad. Upon reporting it to Major-General Gibbon, commanding corps, he ordered some of his staff to take the headquarters escort, the orderlies, &c., and ascertain what it consisted of, &c. Upon reaching the train we found an engine and three box-cars, containing ten or twelve wounded rebels. The locomotive was disabled, but the cars were good. We moved on the next day (4th), passing through Ford's Station, Wilson's Station, and reached Nottoway Court-House at 2