War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 1166 N. AND SE. VA., N.C., W.VA.,MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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Gibbon I assumed command of two batteries of artillery belonging to the Sixth Corps and left in the old entrenched line, and used them against the enemy, who had thrown strong garrison into Forts Gregg and Baldwin behind their line of continuous works. This prevented their retreat or re-enforcement, and as occasion offered I pushed them nearer and nearer, using them until the capture of the works by our forces. Captain Henry A. Vezin, Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry, assistant engineer, was with me and did excellent service during this part of the engagement. During the afternoon, by order of General Gibbon, I posted the troops of General Birney's division so as to make a connection from General Seymour's (Sixth Army Corps) division, on the right, to Turner's (Twenty-fourth Army Corps), on the left. During the night detachments of engineers were put to work building batteries along the line, according to your order. Nothing of importance occurred as regards this branch of the service during the rapid march which was made after the rebel army. At Farmville we had the honor of having our pontoon trains first up, so that we were enabled to pass over the trains and artillery of the Second and Sixth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, although the pontoon trains of that army were better equipped, lighter loaded, possession other advantages over the pontoon trains of our army. The whole engineer command behaved with great credit, and though they were small in numbers they have never been called on in vain. Their duties have been performed quietly, yet effectively and promptly.

I beg leave to mention favorably Brevet Brigadier-General Hall, colonel First New York Volunteers Engineers, who has been untiring in his efforts to carry out my orders and wishes; Lieutenant Franks, Company K, First New York Volunteers Engineers, for zeal and faithful performance of duties; and Lieutenant Buckland, for valuable assistance in the topographical department.

I beg leave to submit to your favorable consideration the following recommendation for promotion, viz: Bvt. Captain William R. King, U. S. Engineers, to be brevet major, U. S. Army, to date from April 9, 1865, for eminent services as engineers officer during this campaign. To his ability we owe many improvements in our works, which have reflected credit upon the profession. Captain Henry A. Vezin, Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry, U. S. Volunteers, acting assistant engineer, to be brevet major, U. S. Volunteers, to date from January 1, 1865, and brevet lieutenant-colonel, U. S. Volunteers, to date from April 9, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services as my assistant during this campaign, and for gallant conduct on the 2nd of April, 1865. Captain James W. Lyon, Fourth Rhode Island Volunteers, chief pontonier Army of the James, to be brevet major, U. S. Volunteers, to date from February 1, 1865, for excessive energy in the organization of his trains for the campaign, and for excellent service with his bridges during the recent freshest of the James River; to be brevet lieutenant-colonel, U. S. Volunteers, to date from April 3, 1865, for meritorious services in forwarding his trains under difficulties greater than that of all others, so that our army was enabled to aid two corps of the Army of the Potomac to cross the river at Farmville to follow in close pursuit of the enemy. Captain Charles B. Parsons, First New York Volunteer Engineers, to be brevet major, U. S. Volunteers, to date from April 9, 1865, for meritorious services during the campaign. Second Lieutenant Joseph Morris, One hundred and twenty-seventh U. S. Colored Troops, to be brevet first lieutenant, U. S. Volunteers, to date from April 1, 1865, for meritorious