War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 0651 Chapter LVIII. THE APPOMATTOX CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

During the operations from the 29th of March to the 9th of April no casualties have occurred, and no guns nor colors have been captured by this command.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. HARWOOD,

Captain of Engineers and Bvt. Major, U. S. Army, Commanding Batten

Captain CHANNING CLAPP,

Asst. Adjt. General, Engineers Brigade, Army of the Potomac.

U. S. ENGINEER BATTALION, Camp near Burke's Station, Va., April 20, 1865.

COLONEL: In compliance with instructions, I have the honor to submit the following report of my service with the different corps of the army during the campaign commencing the 29th of March:

On the 30th I was directed by you to ascertain and report the position of the Fifth Corps after their repulse by the enemy in the morning. I found them reformed in rear of a small tributary of Hatcher's Run, covering the Boydton plank road, with their left flank thrown to the rear and resting on the breast-work of the proceeding night, their right in advance of the Second Corps line, but protected by the thick abatis in front of the line. Again, when the corps advanced in the afternoon I was sent to ascertain and report their position. I found them massed near the White Oak road and preparing to occupy it as soon as a reconnaissance through the dense timber should develop the position of the corps. When I left hem regiments were being thrown out on the right flank in echelon, and General Warren was endeavoring to find and make a connection with the Second Corps.

On the 2nd of April I was sent to communicate with the Cavalry Corps, to find where General Sheridan needed pontoons. I found him at Fort's Station, on the South Side Railroad, and about to march on Southeland's Station, on the same road, where he desired the bridge train to be sent.

On the 6th of April, while with headquarters near Jetersville, I was ordered to report for temporary duty with the Sixth Corps. Between 6 and 7 a. m. the corps took up the line of march across the country in a northeasterly direction toward Amelia Court-House, at which point the enemy were reported as making a stand. I was employed in looking for roads, nd while so doing the order was countermanded. The corps retraced its steps in order, if possible, to cut off the enemy, now reported to be retreating by way of Deatonsville. I was employed in looking for roads, nd while so doing the order was countermanded. The corps retraced its steps in order, if possible, to cut off the enemy, now reported to be retreating by way of Doeatonsville. I was sent to assist Colonel Michler in finding the best road to Pride's Church, by marching on which the corps would cut the enemy's line of retreat to the west of Deatonsville, on which the Second Corps was already marching. The road was found in time to put the corps upon it as soon as it came up, and the leading division, the Third, was pushed to the utmost to get up in time to cut off the enemy's retreat. Shortly after crossing Flat Creek the Second Corps was heard engaged near Deatonville and the cavalry near Price's Church. At the time that the Third Division, Sixth Corps, reached the position of the cavalry, which was on the road from Deatonsivlle to Burke's Station, the cavalry was held in check by the infantry guard of the enemy's train, which was moving off on parallel road, or nearly so, about a quarter of a mile distant. At the same time a portion of the cavalry was intercepting their retreat on the road on which they were moving at a point nearer the South Side Railroad. I reconnoitered the enemy's position, which was a good