War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 0412 N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

I have the call attention to the general good behavior of my officers and men, and to the manner in which they performed the duty assigned to them in the capture of the fort.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALFRED P. ROCKWELL,

Colonel Sixth Connecticut Volunteers, Commanding Regiment.

Captain E. LEWIS MOORE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Second Brigadier, First Division, 24th Army Corps.

Numbers 7. Report of Captain John Thompson, Seventh Connecticut Infantry, of operations January 15.

HDQRS. SEVENTH REGIMENT CONNECTICUT VOLS.,

Near Fort Fisher, N. C., January 17, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my command in the attack on Fort Fisher on the night of the 15th instant:

In pursuance of orders received from Colonel J. C. Abbott, commanding brigade, the regiment moved from its present position at 4.30 p. m., and, marching toward Fort Fisher, reached the outer line of works at about 5.30 p. m. From this point we advanced under a light fire of artillery and infantry, reaching the fort with a loss of but one man, severely wounded. At this point I received a wound in the left foot, which incapacitated me for further duty, and I transferred the command of the regiment to Captain William S. Marble.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN THOMPSON,

Captain, Commanding, Seventh Regiment Connecticut Volunteers.

Captain E. LEWIS MOORE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.

Numbers 8. Report of Captain William S. Marble, Seventh Connecticut Infantry, of operations January 15.

HDQRS. SEVENTH REGIMENT CONNECTICUT VOLUNTEERS,

Near Fort Fisher, N. C., January 17, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to transmit the following report of the part taken by this regiment after I assumed command, which I did immediately upon Captain Thompson being wounded:

Reporting to Colonel Abbott, I received orders to march the regiment into a covered way, leading from near the sally-port toward the center of the fort. Here we were supplied with shovels, and ordered to move forward thirty paces and deploy in a line extending from the eighth traverse to the river, and nearly at right angles with the line of traverses. We were deployed in groups of three, with orders to dig pits for our protection from the fire of the enemy, which at this time was quite annoying. Owing to a lack of shovels many of the men were