War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 0278 N. AND SE.VA., N.C., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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Lieutenant R. P. Warren, One hundred and forty-sixth New York Volunteers, aide-de-camp; First Lieutenant John J. Diehl, Fifteenth New York Heavy Artillery, aide-de-camp.

The courage and fidelity of my mounted messengers under trying circumstances entitles them to be named in this report. They are: Henry Bonnet, Company D, Fifteenth New York Heavy Artillery, standard-bearer and acting corporal; John T. Thomson, Company I, Eighth Maryland Volunteers; William H. Yingling, Company I, Eighth Maryland Volunteers; John T. Bratt, Company H, Eighth Maryland Volunteers; Munroe Fowler, Company H, Eighth Maryland Volunteers; John T. Mackison, Company H, Eighth Maryland Volunteers, severely wounded.

Tabular and nominal lists of casualties will be forwarded as soon as completed.

Brevet Brigadier-General Pearson, commanding the re-enforcements from the First Division, bore himself with gallantry.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. AYRES,

Bvt. Major General, Commanding Second Division, Fifth Army Corps.

Bvt. Colonel FRED. T. LOCKE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

February 18, 1865.

Respectfully returned to Brevet Major-General Ayres.

General Warren requests to know particularly whether the retiring of the division from Dabney's Mill to the breast-works was due to orders received or to the misconduct of the troops on the right of it, or to the misconduct of the troops of the division itself, or to an irresistible force of the enemy. The general commanding does not think there were sufficient reasons for good troops to give way. The losses are not sufficient to justify a retreat. It was his positive orders to remain and fight it out, and he wishes his troops to understand that he will not shield them in his reports. If they won't fight the country must know it. General Warren knows that General Ayres used his best efforts to make them hold their ground and, for his honor as well as that of the commander of the corps, wishes to have it plainly stated that it was the troops and not the generals who would not fight.

By command of Major-General Warren:

FRED. T. LOCKE,

Brevet Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, FIFTH CORPS,

March 17, 1865.

COLONEL: In accordance with the indorsement on my report of the fight near Hatcher's Run on the 6th instant [ultimo], I enter more into detail concerning the fight.

A portion of my command was on picket at the old camp when the cavalry ran through the troops (see report). I was pushing rapidly forward to support the left of the Third Division, so instead of halting till I could get together all my troops, I moved on with what I had. The re-enforcement sent me I ordered formed, one regiment to the right of the mill site, two on the left of my troops. I then ordered my men