War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 0175 Chapter LVIII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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The following is a last of casualties and ammunition expended at the several batteries:

Casualties.

Killed. Wounded. Missing.

Offi- Men. Offi- Men. Offi- Men.

cers. cers. cers.

Battery 4, ... ... ... ... ... ...

Company I..

Battery 5, ... 1 ... ... ... ...

Company E..

Batteries 8 ... ... ... ... ... ...

and 9..

Battery 10.. 1 4 1 2 ... 36

Battery 12.. ... 1 ... 5 ... 13

Fort Haskell.. ... ... ... ... ... ...

Fort Morton.. ... ... ... ... ... ...

Fort Emery.. ... ... ... ... ... ...

Ammunition expended.

30-pounder 8-inch Coehorn 4 1/2- 10-inch

percussion mortar mortar inch mortar

-shells. shells. shells. percuss- shells.

ion-

shells.

Battery 4, Rounds. Rounds. Rounds. Rounds. Rounds.

Company I.. 136 ... ... ... ...

Battery 5, 178 89 ... ... ...

Company E..

Batteries 8 ... ... 260 ... ...

and 9..

Battery 10.. ... ... ... ... ...

Battery 12.. ... ... 240 ... ...

Fort ... ... 225 ... ...

Haskell..

Fort ... ... ... 5 43

Morton..

Fort Emery.. ... ... ... 33 ...

In conclusion I take great pleasure in saying that the conduct of both officers and men is deserving of the highest praise, and for promptness and energy could not be excelled. Especially I may mention Captain Twiss, commanding Company K, at battery Numbers 10; also Lieutenant Casey. Through the energetic efforts of these officers the enemy were kept in check long enough to enable the works on their right and left to prepare for action and repulse the assaults.

Lieutenant Lewis, commanding Company L, at battery Numbers 12 and Haskell, Lieutenants Bingham and Couch, of the same company, are deserving of much credit for the manner on which these batteries were served. Lieutenant Bangs, Company E, at Battery Numbers 5, deserves to be mentioned, for through the fire of three separate batteries was directed on his work, it was entirely ignored, and his concentrated fire of four 8-inch mortars and two 30-pounder guns was directed on Fort Stedman, and with terrible effect. At his battery one of the enemy's shells penetrated and burst inside the magazine, and through there were four barrels of powder in it at the time, strange to say ot failed to ignite, and no injury was done.

GEORGE AGER,

Major First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

Lieutenant C. W. FILER,

First Connecticut Arty., Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE ARTILLERY,

Broadway Landing, Va., March 29, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded to artillery headquarters, Army of the Potomac.

I proceeded to the spot when notified of the attack, and was personally cognizant of the accuracy of most of Major Ager's report. The only thing which should be added is, that he himself exhibited great judgment and skill in commanding his batteries and that his exertions contributed much to the successful result of the affair. By his concentric fire the enemy were severely cut up and demoralized both while trying to form and when on their retreat.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Brevet Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.