War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 0166 N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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completely destroying her. The following table shows the fire upon the fleet after daylight, before it escaped up the river, about noon:

100-pounder. 10-inch sea-coasts mortar.

Battery. Commanding Fired. Hit. Fired. Hit.

officer.

Persons and Lieutenant 57 30 25 2

Wilcox. H. A. Pratt,

1st

Connecticut

Artillery.

Spofford. Lieutenant ... ... ... ...

C. N.

Silliman,

1st

Connecticut

Artillery.

Sawyer. Lieutenant 21 7 31 2

E. P. Mason,

1st

Connecticut

Artillery.

Total. 78 37 56 4

30-pounder Parrott.

Battery. Commanding Fired. Hit. Range.

officer.

Persons and Lieutenant ... ... Yards.

Wilcox. H. A. Pratt, 1,500

1st

Connecticut

Artillery.

Spofford. Lieutenant 62 27 1,800

C. N.

Silliman,

1st

Connecticut

Artillery.

Sawyer. Lieutenant ... ... 2,500

E. P. Mason,

1st

Connecticut

Artillery.

Total. 62 27

As soon as the rams could get afloat they retreated out of range, near Howlett Battery, leaving the torpedo-boat aground. About 3 a. m. on 25th they escaped up the river past Fort Brady, receiving a number of rounds in the darkness, several of which struck them.

The ammunition used in this engagement consisted in part of solid shot, and in part of shell - percussion and time - and case. Unfortunately the line of fire when the rams were aground was oblique, and the projectiles glanced off without penetrating. Officers on picket directly opposite, however, report that the armor was started and partially ripped off in a number of places. During the firing my batteries, especially Forts Brady and parsons and Wilcox, were under a very heavy fire from the rebel land batteries. Three men were killed in the former, and a large number slightly injured from fragments, &c. Too much commendation cannot be given to Captain Pierce, commanding Fort Brady, and to Lieutenants Pratt, Mason, and Silliman, commanding the other batteries, for their excellent conduct. The total firing, including those fired in reply to the rebel land batteries, was about 500 rounds of siege ammunition. Lieutenant W. G. Ball, Thirteenth New York Artillery, also moved a 20-pounder Parrot (field gun) to the bank of the river and fired eighty-five rounds, at a range of about 1,400 yards, with creditable zeal.

At 6.30 p. m. on January 5 I received an order from General Grant to embark a siege train, which ultimately proved to be destined for Fort Fisher. I was to accompany it with a sufficient detail of artillerymen from my command and a company of volunteer engineers from General Benham's brigade, also a small detachment from general Graham's naval brigade. During January 6 I was waiting transforation, but removed three companies of First Connecticut Artillery from the lines, and also two 30-pounder Parrotts and four Coehorn mortars. The propeller C. C. Leary, 841 tons, reported at 8 a. m. on January 7, and my ordnance officers at once began loading her, from both sides, with all possible dispatch with the ordnance. They employed about 150 men. The propeller Scott, 1,086 tons, reported at 3 p. m., with 50,000 feet of lumber on board. By 8 p. m. she was ready to sail, with two companies (280 men) and thirty-six mules. At 7.30 a. m. of January 8, the propeller Governor Chase, 746 tons, reported. At noon she was ready to sail, with two companies (282 men) and forty-one animals. During the evening the three steamers, with my headquarters on the Leary, dropped down to City Point, where I received written orders from General Terry. My command consisted of 20 officers, 568 men, 77 animals, 12 wagons, sixteen 30-pounder Parrotts, 20 Coehorns, with 8,000 rounds for former and 6,600 for latter,