War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 0151 Chapter LVIII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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road crossing Hatcher's Run still lower down, the cavalry division under General Gregg. General Gregg was ordered to move to Dinwiddie Court-House, and to move up and down the Boydton road to intercept and capture the enemy's trains, and was further ordered to determine whether or met he could in any way inflict damage upon the enemy. General Warren to support General Gregg; General Humphreys, to support General Warren. All other available troops of this army were to be held ready to move at short notice. The different commands reached their post in due season, but it was found difficult to open communication between Generals Humphreys and Warren along the Vaughan road. General Gregg proceeded to Dinwiddie Court-House, and moved up and down the Vaughan road and captured some 18 wagons and 50 prisoners, including 1 colonel. Finding that the Boydton road was but little used since the destruction of the bridges on that road and on the Weldon railroad, he returned to Malone's Bridge, on Hatcher's Run. At 4.15 p. m. the enemy, with what was reported to be Hill's corps and Gordon's and Pegram's divisions, attacked Humphreys. They were handsomely repulsed, with a loss to Humphreys of 300. Since this force had attacked Humphreys' right, consisting of but one division entire and one brigade, it became necessary to send for men enough to hold our communications with our rear line. One division of the Ninth and one division of the Sixth Corps were therefore ordered to re-enforce Humphreys. Warren, with the cavalry, has been ordered to connect with his left and to report to him. In the morning, I find that this force of the enemy is outside of his works, I shall attack and drive him into them, taking advantage of anything disclosed by the operation. During the day it is estimated that we have taken 100 prisoners.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

february 6, 1865 - 1 a. m. (Sent 1.15 a. m.)

I have just received intelligence that my aide, Captain Jay, taking orders to General Gregg, met the enemy in force where the malone road leaves the Halifax road. Jay was fired on, and is missing, but his escort escaped. This is undoubtedly the enemy's cavalry come up from Stony Creek. They are now in Gregg's rear, on the road he took, and only one mile and a half from him if he is at Malone's Bridge. I have sent this information to Warren, with directions to make every effort to communicate it to Gregg, and have instructed Warren to send a division to cover our rear on the Weldon railroad, as the cavalry may advance that may to-morrow morning. If Gregg gets my orders to rejoin Warren through that officer, he can be withdraw of the Vaughan road; but if Warren's staff officer meets the safe of Captain Jay, Gregg's position will be precarious, as the enemy's cavalry will be in his rear, and their infantry, on Warren's withdrawal, now taking place, will interpose between him and the Vaughan road. I am in hopes Warren's artillery and trains, ordered back on the road he took, will get in safely.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.