War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0962 Chapter LVI. OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA.

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The above change will be made successively. When Colcock relieves Colonel Bird's pickets, above Heyward's upper place, Colonel Bird will relieve Captain Eve's pickets, now above Moreland's. Commanding officer will instruct their pickets not to waste their ammunition by firing on the enemy across the river, ad to keep themselves concealed behind the river-bank, and make every effort to prevent the enemy landing on this side of the river.

Colonel Colcock and Colonel Bird will establish immediately a courier line between these and their headquarters.

By command of Brigadier General R. H. Anderson:

W. W. GORDON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHARLESTON, December 15, 1864.

Major General SAMUEL JONES:

What is cause of delay in your attack? Increase of tents on Tybee Island may denote reduction of force in your front. Can you not feel enemy's strength without exposing your proposed plans?

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

SAVANNAH, December 15, 1864.

(Via Hardeeville 3. 30 a. m. 16th.)

Major-General JONES:

Our occupation of Savannah depends on your ability to hold the railroad. Whenever you are unable to hold the road I must evacuate. You must strengthen your position by throwing up works and by making strong abatis. Inform me instantly if Foster is re-enforced by Sherman or otherwise. I feel uneasy about my communications.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

SAVANNAH, December 16, 1864.

Major-General WHEELER,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: In assigning Colonel Colcock to the defense of New River it would be well to give him all or as large a part of his regiment as possible. Three companies of his regiment are here and cannot be spared; the remainder might be gotten together. If you can get Colonel Colcock's staff with him I would be glad to have you do so. Your command embraced the country between New River and the Savannah River, incidentally, all other points which may be attacked in your neighborhood.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

CHEVES' PLACE, December 16, 1864-1. 30 a. m.

Major General JOSEPH WHEELER,

Commanding Cavalry Corps, Army of Tennessee:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I have just left General Hardee and all the other generals in a council of war. My orders are (and to give you the same from General Hardee) to go to work at once and get all the flats