War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0931 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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SAVANNAH, December 5, 1864.

General S. JONES:

Last information from Wheeler is that all movements of the enemy tend toward Savannah. We still hold Station 4 1/2, Central railroad.

T. B. ROY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GRAHAMVILLE, December 5, 1864.

Major General SAM. JONES:

The gun-boats in position off Dawson's Bluff shelling the works protecting Coosawhatchie. Captain Kanapaux asks for 20-pounder Parrots; can you furnish them to him?

JAS. CHESTNUT, Jr.,

Brigadier-General.

COOSAWHATCHIE, December 5, 1864.

Major STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

My scouts reported the enemy advancing at 1 o'clock to-day, with artillery and infantry. General Chestnut telegraphed me at 3 o'clock that scouts reported the enemy advancing on the Bee's Creek breast-works in considerable force. Several barges are reported coming up the Coosawhatchie River. They advanced their pickets within 200 yards of Bee's Creek works, four miles distant. We fired on them, and they retired. They are still in our front, four or five miles distant. I have about 1,600 men of all arms. I will dispatch you again as soon as scouts come in. We need more artillery.

L. J. GARTRELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

COOSAWHATCHIE, December 5, 1864-7 p. m.

Major STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Enemy's gun-boats, five in number, retired half a mile lower down the river. Their infantry and artillery have also retired about three miles beyond our outer works. All quiet to-night.

L. J. GARTRELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

AUGUSTA, GA., December 6, 1864.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States:

SIR: Your letters of the 30th ultimo, acknowledging the receipt of my telegram of 24th of November, was received by me on the road from Macon to this place. With the limited reliable means at our command I believe that all that could be has been done, under existing circumstances, to oppose the advance of Sherman's forces toward the Atlantic coast. That we have not thus far been more successful none can regret more than myself, but he will doubtless be prevented from capturing Augusta, Charleston, and Savannah, and he may yet be made to experience serious loss before reaching the coast.