War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0923 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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bridge is Ray's, two miles in air line; Thompson's, six miles below Ray's; Gadby's, six or seven miles below Thompson's; Ellison's, seven or eight miles below Ellison's [Thompson's?]. To each of these bridges I send immediately an officer and five men as you direct. I think, with my brigade in its present disposition, that I can hold the enemy in check for some time.

Respectfully, yours, &c.,

JOS. H. LEWIS,

Brigadier-General.

GRAHAMVILLE, December 2, 1864.

General SAMUEL JONES:

Troops coming from Augusta must not stop in Charleston, but be hurried forward to Savannah. I leave for Savannah this afternoon.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

GRAHAMVILLE, December 2, 1864.

Major General SAMUEL JONES:

Send Captain Brooks with the 270 men to Savannah instead of Grahamville.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

AUGUSTA, December 2, 1864.

General SAMUEL JONES:

Thirteen hundred South Carolina militia, under Colonel De Saussure, will leave here for Savannah at 6 p. m. Provide transportation to Savannah on their arrival.

By command of General Bragg:

M. B. McMICKEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief Quartermaster.

RICHMOND, December 2, 1864.

[General BRAXTON BRAGG:]

GENERAL: I trust you will pardon my presumption in writing you on military subjects, but my knowledge of the country and the railway lines in Georgia and South Carolina emboldens me to offer a suggestion, which I am certain you will receive in the spirit in which it is offered. Of course it will occur to you that the moment the enemy offered. Of course it will occur to you that the moment the enemy reaches Millen, in Georgia, and any point on the Charleston and Savannah Railroad in South Carolina, Savannah becomes hope lessly isolated, and can neither raise re-enforcements from Augusta or Charleston, nor send any to either of those places. Some place must be given up, however, and it were better Savannah then Charleston. But there is a large amount of most valuable rolling-stock at Savannah, and many locomotives, tools, machine shops, cotton and tobacco. The cotton and tobacco should be destroyed, if necessary, and the rolling-stock, &c.,