War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0919 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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far as Columbia, and that the enemy is concentrating all his available forces, under General Thomas, to oppose him. It is even reliable reported that the forces under Generals A. J. Smith, in Missouri, and Steele, in Arkansas, have been sent to re-enforce Thomas. It becomes, then, absolutely necessary, to insure the success of Hood, either that you should send him two or more divisions, or that you at once threaten Missouri, in order to compel the enemy to recall the re-enforcements he is sending to General Thomas. I beg to urge upon you prompt and decisive action. The fate of the country may depend upon the result of Hood's campaign in Tennessee. Sherman's army has lately abandoned Atlanta on a venturesome march across Georgia to the Atlantic coast about Savannah. His object is, besides the destruction of public and private property, probably to re-enforce Grant and compel Lee to abandon Richmond. It is hoped that Sherman may be prevented from effecting his object, but should it be otherwise, the success of Hood in Tennessee and Kentucky would counterbalance the moral effect of the loss of Richmond. Hence the urgent necessity of either re-enforcing Hood or making a diversion in Missouri in his favor.

Hoping that you may give us the desired assistance, I remain, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General.

AUGUSTA, December 2, 1864.

General S. COOPER:

Following received from Lieutenant-General Hardee, dated yesterday, at Savannah:

I have just returned from the front. The enemy was badly whipped, and has retired. Coosawhatchie, another point on railroad, is threatened, but do not apprehend a serious attack.

BRAXTON BRAGG.

(Copies sent President and Secretary of War.)

GRAHAMVILLE, December 2, 1864.

General S. COOPER:

A force of infantry, artillery, and cavalry, under Foster, attempted to gain the railroad at this point, but were met and repulsed. A force of marines, under Dahlgren, attempted to gain the railroad at Coosawhatchie, but were met at Bee's Creek and repulsed.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

(Copies sent President, Secretary of War, Generals Lee and Bragg.)

GRAHAMVILLE, December 2, 1864.

General McLAWS:

The enemy is moving upon us. Put about 1,000 men in the cars immediately, and hold them in readiness to come to this point.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.