War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0811 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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who is instructed to arrange so as to get sea-going vessels up to the city wharves, which, if possible, I am very anxious to do, even at considerable expense of labor and money, as I desire to avoid lightening and trans-shipment if possible. I am informed by the Quartermaster-General, from Washington, that six light-draft steamers are new en route to us from the Chesapeake. We had a very pleasant Christmas; I trust you had the same.

Very truly, yours,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Savannah, December 26, 1864.

Major General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington City, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 19th instant, before receiving which, however, I had already written you fully. General Easton is busily engaged in reducing to order and system all matters pertaining to his department, and your letters are referred to him to act in accordance with them. You may rely upon my drawing from this country everything it affords for our wants, and adding as little as possible to the burdens of the Government. I am much pleased to hear of the efficient service rendered by the quartermaster's employees in Tennessee. I shall always favor their organization for such purposes, and furnish them with anything subject to my order.

Very truly, your friend and obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

CHIEF ENGINEER'S OFFICE,

Savannah, GA., December 26, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding:

GENERAL: In accordance with your instructions, I have the honor to submit the accompany rough sketch* of plan for the defense of this city I have reduced the garrison to the lowest probable limit; a smaller one would render it difficult to use any part of it for such offensive operations as might be desirable. The proposed line will be so close to the city that some of the building will have to be torn down, and in case of attack all parts of the city will be under artillery fire. Still, the presence of the women and children of the enemy within our lines will render such a fire extremely improbable; and should it be decided by the enemy that they ought to bombard the city, all stores and other valuable property will be quite secure at or near the levee. It is proposed to hold Fort Jackson only because a temporary occupation of it by the enemy would cause us serious inconvenience; to destroy it would require much labor, and even then its site would remain, which would be as detrimental to our interests as the fort itself. Fort Boggs

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*Not found.

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