War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0764 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

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HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,

Near Savannah, GA., December 19, 1864.

Colonel H. A. BARNUM,

Commanding Third Brigade:

COLONEL: The general commanding division directs that you take charge of the construction of Fort No. 3, and push if as far toward completion to-night as possible. He wishes the working parties thoroughly organized in the most efficient manner before dark, the whole to under command of an energetic field officer who understands how the work should be done. The officer in charge of them he wishes you to hold responsible for every man under their command, that they will not neglect their work, as was done last night.

I am, Colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. FORBLES,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., December 19, 1864.

Captain C. R. SUTER,

Chief Engineer Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C.:

CAPTAIN: The major-General commanding directs that you proceed immediately to the from, and remain with the Coast Division during its operations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

DECEMBER 19, 1864.

[General JOHN G. FOSTER:]

GENERAL: The lady who makes the inclosed statements is the most observing person I have found, and I think that her statement is more likely to be true. It seems probable that the people of Savannah may be able to hold out for thirty days. I think this an outside calculation.

Respectfully,

JAMES F. HALL,

Lieutenant Colonel 1st New York Engrs., Pro. March General, Dept. of the South.

[Inclosure.]

Mrs. Hodges states that there was a large quantity of provisions in Savannah when she left on the 3rd of November. She knew of two Government stores on Broughton street, one over 150 feet and one 75 feet; the lower floor was filled with rice, hominy, meal, and bacon; there was a great quantity. There was another store on Bay street, where provisions were sold to the people. There were a number of private stores filled with provisions. She estimates that there is rice, hominy, and bacon enough to supply the present army and inhabitants at least two weeks. The people depended principally on the markets. The chief supply came from the Albany and Gulf Railroad. The citizens have mostly private supplies to a considerable amount. It might be that they could hold out for a month.