War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0747 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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Pine Point battery, and the plank-road battery should all be charged simultaneously. The greatest obstacle to overcome prior to reaching the enemy's works is the canal, which is represented by the negroes as being about four feet deep in front of Lawton's battery, but from five to six feet deep in front of the other two.

Very respectfully,

M. D. LEGGETT,

Brigadier-General.

P. S. -Lieutenant Hasler, Twentieth Ohio, now on picket, represents just this moment that the enemy moved a considerable body of troops to the vicinity of the plank-road battery just before sundown. I have sent for him, and if I find his statements of a count I will forward them. I have not seen him myself.

M. D. L.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, December 18, 1864.

Captain CADLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have just had a talk with Lieutenant Hasler, Twentieth Ohio. He says that he distinctly saw a large column of rebel troops move down the big road and file into the rear of their works in this front and the front of General Woods. He thinks there was nearly or quite a division of them. He says he could see but one point in the road, and they were about one hour passing that point, and seemed well clothed, and all dressed in dark clothing, black or blue. This took place from 4 to 5 this p. m. He says that several soldiers who were at the rifle-pit with him saw the same. Lieutenant Hasler sustains the reputation of a good officer and reliable man. I can hardly think they intend a demonstration upon us, neither do I believe they can afford so many troops to garrison our front. I have just sent my picket officer out to put the pickets sand reserves on the alert.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. D. LEGGETT,

Brigadier-General.

P. S. -The same officer says there was considerable commotion in the rebel camp last night, and he thinks they moved away a portion of their artillery.

M. D. L.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, ARMY OF Georgia,

December 18, 1864.

Major General J. C. DAVIS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I presume General Sherman called on you to-day, and informed you of his intention to attempt to carry the first line in our front as soon as our artillery can be placed in position. I think everything will be in readiness within two days. The assault will be made simultaneously at every accessible point on the line. there are several points in front of the Twentieth Corps which I think can be carried. We are making fascines of straw and canebrakes; also practicing with