War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0743 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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way. But I still hope that events will give me time to take Savannah, even if I have to assault with some loss. I am satisfied that unless we take it the gun-boats never will, for they can make no impression upon the batteries which guard every approach from the sea; and I have a faint belief that when Colonel Babcock reaches you you will delay operations long enough to enable me to succeed. With Savannah in our possessions at some future time, if not now, we can punish South Carolina as she deserves, and as thousands of people in Georgia hoped we would do. I do sincerely believe that the whole United States, North and South, would rejoice to have this army turned loose on South Carolina to devastate that State, in the manner we have done in Georgia, and it would have a direct and immediate bearing on your campaign in Virginia.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Savannah, GA., December 18, 1864.

Major General O. O. HOWARD,

Commanding Army of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: The General-in-chief has just returned from General Slocum's, where he made a demand or the surrender of Savannah, &c., which was denied. He wishes you to make the necessary preparations at once for assaulting the place. He wishes to know if the crossing of the creek is practicable, and if you can make a diversion about Rosedew. General Slocum has received his orders, and General Davis and General Williams are ready, or nearly so.

I am, General, with respect, &c.,

L. M. DAYTON,

Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Savannah, GA., December 18, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi:

GENERAL: Your letter of date just received. Major-General Blair thinks he can make a lodgement in his front, and has been directed to proceed as rapidly as possible with the preparations. If I can get the water transportation from General Foster in time I believe the diversion just beyond Beaulieu to be practicable-that is, with one division.

Respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

SPECIAL

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT AND FIELD ORDERS,

ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE, Numbers 198.

Near Savannah, GA., December 18, 1864.

I. The prisoners of war taken by this army, now in charge of the several provost-marshals, will immediately be turned over to Major F. C. Gillette, provost-marshal Fifteenth Army Corps, who, with a suit-