War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0739 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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FORT MONROE, VA., December 17, 1864-7. 30 a. m.

(Received 10. 40 a. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

I have the honor to report my arrival here this morning at 5 o'clock, with dispatches from Sherman and Foster. I send you in cipher a telegram from Foster. I will be in Washington this p. m. with full and detailed dispatches from General Sherman.

JNO F. ANDERSON,

Major and Additional Aide-de-Camp, Staff o general Foster.

HDQRS. COAST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Davis's Neck, S. C., December 17, 1864.

[Major-General FOSTER,

Commanding Department of the South:]

GENERAL: One train passed up yesterday morning; it consisted of two passenger and one freight car. We got a battery into position last night bearing on the bridge; have not opened with it, as we hope to catch a train crossing this morning. the enemy have but four regiments opposite me; they have also one at Pocotaligo. A train was lying all day yesterday below Coosawhatchie, but out of sight; it would move when we threw shells into the woods. No deserters this morning.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO P. HATCH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. NORTHERN DISTRICT, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

FIRST SEPARATE BRIGADE,

Morris Island, S. C., December 17, 1864.

Captain W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to inform you that the truce existing in Charleston Harbor, for the purpose of exchange of prisoners, terminated to-day at 10 a. m. by mutual agreement. Instruction s to that effect were furnished me by Lieutenant-Colonel Mulford, a copy of which I have the honor to annex. there is nothing father of importance to communicate. The enemy remain quiet, as well as myself, not a shot having been fired on either side since I assumed command. A small regiment returned on the `14th, passing from John's Island over the bridge to James Island. They are probably the Forty-seventh Georgia, as the men were heard conversing in loud tones during the following night in the camp of that regiment. The only quarter in which the enemy exhibits increased activity is in the vicinity of the batteries on John's Island, which have been erected for the purpose do covering the bridge which crossed to Fort Pingle. About 200 men, infantry, four heavy pieces of artillery, and a wagon train were observed yesterday crossing Stono river form James to John's Island, marching in a westerly direction. The guard at Charleston proper has been re-enforce by one company of infantry and one company of cavalry, which later is doing outpost duty north of Charleston at the distance of several miles (inter-