War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0736 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

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high water; up to the railroad bridge from the mouth of the river there is ten feet of water at low water. All the vessels with supplies may come to the railroad bridge, but from there to this point lighters must be used, except at high water, when the light-draught steamers may be used, except at high water, when the light-draught steamers may come up. the siege battery of 30-pounder Parrotts is in the river; three pieces on the steamer Sylph and three more on another steamer. Forage is also here on vessels, both steam and sailing. Two large steamers and one schooner with commissary stores are also in the river coming up. In going down I will endeavor to pick up on the plantations pilots enough to place one on each vessel, if possible, and hurry them up. All of them should arrive at the railroad bridge at noon to-morrow. The Sylph is of light-draught, and can come directly here and land the 30-pounder Parrots at the landing. I shall leave as soon as the water rises sufficiently to proceed directly to Hilton Head, to send a steamer to Fortress Monroe with Lieutenant-Colonel Babcock. After that I shall return at once.

Respectfully, yours,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, VA., December 17, 1864.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

The Richmond papers of to-day contain the following:

FROM Georgia-SHERMAN'S MOVEMENTS.

The Augusta Register, received this morning, s as that it was stated in that city on the 13th that the Federals have possession of the Savannah, Albany and Gulf Railroad. It is also said that they captured a passenger train on the same. Among the persons taken was R. R. Cuyler, esq., the president of the road. It is also reported that the Yankees have possession of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad bridge over the Savannah River. the Charleston Mercury of the day before says that, meantime, Sherman has been pressing steadily toward the city; our forces had fallen back to the junction of the Georgia Central and Charleston and Savannah Railroad bridge overs the Savannah River. The Charleston Mercury of the day before says that, meantime, Sherman has been pressing steadily toward the city; our forces had fallen back to the junction of the Georgia Central and Charleston and Savannah Railroad, about three miles from the city. At this important point, which commands both roads, General Hardee took his stand. It was confidently reported yesterday, and we think, that Sherman's forces were in Hardee's front, and that a demand for the surrender of the city having been refused, heavy fighting ensued, and was going on yesterday. Of the result, however, if any, no news whatever has reached us. We may hear something to-day. The community of Savannah seem firm and quiet. For the present, the trains will cease to run through between the two cities. General Gartrell states that for several days he observed frequent signals between the Federal forces toward Port Royal and Sherman's forces in the direction of Sister's Ferry forces toward Port Royal and Sherman's forces in the direction of Sister's Ferry, on the Savannah railroad. The impression of the South was that Sherman was crossing at the ferry, and would co-operate with Foster's forces in opening the way to Port Royal.

The Dispatch, speaking of the raid into Southwest Virginia, says that: