War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0691 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

[Inclosure.]

WAYNESBOROUGH, GA., December 6, 1864.

General WHEELER:

DEAR SIR: Captain Norton, of the Yankee cavalry, died last night at my house, and Mr. Michael D. Lacey, Company B, Tenth Ohio Cavalry, U. S. Volunteers, who was left as nurse, is still at my house awaiting orders from you.

Yours,

EDMUND BYNE.

HDQRS. SECOND BRIGADE, THIRD CAVALRY DIVISION,

MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Near Savannah, GA., December 11, 1864 - 2 p. m.

Captain DAYTON:

My scouting party sent our to Springfield this morning reports a brigade of rebel cavalry nineteen miles from Savannah, moving south on a road north of this (the Louisville road) and in the direction of the Augusta road. They saw one regiment pass, and a lady said there was a brigade with five ambulances and no artillery. I have notified Colonel Hamilton, Ninth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, who is on the Augusta road.

I am, Colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

SMITH D. ATKINS,

Colonel Ninety-second Illinois Mounted Infty. Vols., Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Fort Pulaski, GA., December 11, 1864.

Captain W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that three deserters (privates) from the First Georgia Regulars, Colonel Wayne commanding, stationed on Whitemarsh and Wilmington Islands, came to this post this morning. They were on picket on Wilmington, and left Thursday night. They report that their regiment was under orders to go to Ogeechee, on the Gulf railroad, to meet some of Sherman's forces, as an attack was daily expected. They also report that the day they left the adjutant of the regiment said a dispatch had been received from Savannah that Sherman was within twelve miles of the city. An irregular cannonading has been heard in the direction of Savannah since 2 o'clock this morning. At times it has been quite brisk, and other times more slow and irregular. As near as we have been able to judge the firing seemed to be of light and heavy artillery. The commanding officer of the Wissahickon reports that from his mast head the bursting of shells was occasionally seen.

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. P. BROWN, Jr.,

Colonel, Commanding Post.