War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0653 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, ARMY OF Georgia,

Four Miles from Springfield, December 7, 1864 - 11 a. m.

Major General J. C. DAVIS,

Commanding Fourteenth Corps:

The major-General commanding desires me to say that this column will probably reach Springfield to-night. We find the roads badly obstructed, and the rain is constantly making them worse. The Seventeenth Corps will be at Guyton (Numbers 3, Central railroad) to-night and the Fifteenth Corps at or near Eden (Numbers 2); they are crossing to-day. The general is of the opinion that the enemy will not give up the Charleston and Savannah road without a fight, and thinks you may be attacked at any time before you reach that road. He desires me to suggest that you strengthen your advance guard, keep your column well closed up, and let Kilpatrick take care of your rear. Please indicate where you will probably encamp to-night, and, if possible, communicate with us to-morrow. We shall not move beyond Springfield until further orders and until we know where your column is.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. C. RODGERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Five Miles North of Sister's Ferry, December 7, 1864 - 3. 10 p. m.

Colonel H. C. RODGERS,

Chief of Staff, Left Wing:

COLONEL: Your dispatch by Corporal Cureton and party is just received. My advance division took dinner at Sister's Ferry; my rear will reach there to-night. My headquarters will be about five miles from that place. The enemy shows himself at all the ferries on the opposite bank of the river. A little skirmishing has been reported in my rear this morning. We find fallen timber across all the creeks and swamps. I sent a messenger to you at daylight this morning. Our roads are bad, but I will make nearly twenty miles to-day by dint of hard work and rapid marching. I had already made arrangements to place more troops in my front.

Yours, respectfully,

JEF. C. DAVIS,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH CORPS,

December 7, 1864 - 12 m.

[Brigadier General A. S. WILLIAMS,

Commanding Twentieth Corps:]

GENERAL: There is a small stream ahead of the Turkey Creek which does not amount to more than eight or ten inches of water. The water in Turkey Creek is nearly three to three and a quarter feet deep. It will take the pioneers and pontoniers at least two hours to fix a good corduroy to cross it. As soon as the infantry comes across Turkey Creek I shall proceed to keep you further advised.

Respectfully,

CHAS. W. ASMUSSEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.