War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0643 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

(Numbers 2) to your right, as rapidly as you may wish to march. He will accompany your column, and if occasion requires will modify these orders.

I am, General, yours, respectfully,

L. M. DAYTON,

Aide-de-Camp.

You will keep a small force moving abreast of your column on the railroad, with orders to burn all bridges and culverts, but need not tear up or burn track.

L. M. DAYTON,

Aide-de-Camp.

ORDERS,] HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, 17TH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, GA., December 6, 1864.

The troops of this command will be prepared to march to-morrow at 9 a. m. Order of March: First, pioneer corps; second, Third Brigade; third, Company C, First Michigan [Artillery]; fourth, First Brigade; fifth, Second Brigade; sixth, ambulance train; seventh, ordnance train; eight, supply train. Brigadier-General Sprague will designate one regiment to march in rear of the train.

By order of Major General Joseph A. Mower:

CHAS. CHRISTENSEN,

Lieutenant, Aide-de-Camp and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION SEVENTEENTH

ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 167.

Station Numbers 4 1/2, GA., December 6, 1864.

* * * * *

III. This command will be held in readiness to move at 8 o'clock to-morrow. The Second Brigade, Colonel R. K. Scott commanding, will have the advance. Artillery and trains as heretofore.

By order of Brigadier General M. D. Leggett:

J. C. DOUGLAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, ARMY OF Georgia,

Near intersection Mill Ray and Halley's Ferry Road, December 6, 1864 - 7 a. m.

Captain L. M. DAYTON,

Aide-de-Camp:

Your note of yesterday is received. The officer I sent to open communication with General Davis returned last night. Kilpatrick's fight with Wheeler (the 4th) commenced near Thomas' Station, from which point Kilpatrick drove the enemy through Waynesborough and across Brier Creek. He burned the railroad bridge over that stream and all the road bridges between there and Jacksonborough. Kilpatrick lost in killed and wounded about 200 men, and brought in 100 prisoners. Two divisions of the Fourteenth Corps, with the entire corps train, encamped last night at Buck Creek Post-Office; the other division, with Kilpatrick's cavalry, was at Jacksonborough. The Twentieth Corps is well closed up at this point, and moving this morning. In the absence