War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0603 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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crossed by it. General Corse built a log bridge across it; meanwhile the engineer regiment threw a bridge across at Clifton Ferry, and before 2 p. m. a brigade of General Corse's was sent to destroy as much of the railroad as possible; one mile was completely burned. A scouting party went three miles below, to Scarborough, and captured a mail and procured some information, which I inclose. The right column is now in Statesborough road, near the Seventeenth to destroy the railroad as far as Scarborough, but will not advance unless you so direct.

I am now in readiness to cross at Clifton Ferry, or to move on and cross wherever you may wish.

Respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

FORAGE DEPARTMENT, QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

Savannah, November 22, 1864.

Mr. WILLIAM B. FARR,

Screven County:

DEAR SIR: It is of the utmost importance that grain be forwarded from Screven County immediately, and I hereby direct you to work, if necessary, night and day to accomplish this end. On the Central road the agents who are not agents for collection of tax in kind, I direct you to employ as my agents for the time. On Savannah River, if necessary, I hereby empower you to use my name in employing such agents, for the time being, as may be necessary to forward these supplies. I expect from 6,000 to 10,000 bushels corn from you in next ten days, as tax in kind. I have empowered Colonel Lawton to impress all surplus forage. Upon the prompt receipt of forage from Screven County may depend the defeat of Sherman, as this city is evidently his objective point.

Sacks have been sent to you at Nos. 5, 6, and 7, Charleston railroad.

BENJ. E. CRANE,

Major and Quartermaster.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE, DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Clifton Ferry, GA., December 2, 1864.

Major General O. O. HOWARD,

Commanding Army of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that, after the laying of the pontoon bridge this a. m., I crossed with your escort company, and, in accordance with instructions received from you, advanced four miles southeast from the bridge and entered Scarborough, or Station Numbers 7, about 3 o'clock. A train, consisting of an engine and four box-cars, had been there two hours previous, having come up from Savannah and immediately returned. I found in that post-office a file of late papers which I inclose. Citizens report that nineteen car-loads of troops passed south on Monday last. No other troops have gone south