War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0569 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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Pensacola to meet General Sherman, as, according to the best information received, he appears now to have crossed the Oconee and to be heading toward the Atlantic coast. Orders are to-day issued to the forage officer in New York to ship daily until further orders, or definite information shows a change to be necessary, 30,000 rations of grain and the same of hay. All this is ordered to the chief quartermaster of Department of the South, Major C. W. Thomas, who is instructed to take charge of it, and, subject to your instructions, forward it to such point on the coast as may ultimately prove most convenient for General Sherman. The supplies at Pensacola are intended for him; and if he should arrive at any point within your department and open communication with you, he should be informed that they are at that place, and that such orders as he may send there will be obeyed. Captain Whittemore, assistant quartermaster, has gone to Pensacola in charge of the supplies sent to that place. Among the first shipments, which were equally divided between Pensacola and Hilton Head, were clothing to refit 30,000 men and a supply of harness, wagons, ambulances, portable barges, &c. The Subsistence and Ordnance Departments will doubtless inform you of the supplies which they have sent forward. I have ordered to-day some salt sent to Hilton Head for the horses and mules, which, after a long interior march, will feel the want of it.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Brevet Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

CONFIDENTIAL.] QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., November 28, 1864.

Major C. W. THOMAS,

Chief Quartermaster Department of the South, Hilton Head:

(Through General Van Vliet, Quartermaster's Department, New York.)

MAJOR: Supplies of clothing forage, subsistence, ammunition, and quartermaster's stores have been shipped to Hilton Head, as a rendezvous, to wait the movements of General Sherman's army, for some weeks past. To-day orders for daily shipment of 30,000 rations each of hay and grain have gone forward. I have also ordered 150 barrels of salt for the animals to be shipped to you. You will take charge of all these stores, and hold them in readiness for transportation to whatever point General Sherman may make his base. you will take the instructions of General Foster on this subject. I have written to him fully this day. Supplies of clothing, forage, and quartermaster's stores have gone to Pensacola. The quantity heretofore shipped to each post - Port Royal and Pensacola - was estimated to be sufficient for the immediate wants of an army 15,000 strong at each place. Should General Sherman establish his base on the Atlantic within the Department of the South, the fact that supplies are at Pensacola waiting his orders should be made known to him, and, if he directs, a fast-sailing steamer should go to Pensacola to order them to such post as he may designate. Captain Whittemore, assistant quartermaster, has sailed for Pensacola, and will remain there in charge of the supplies specially intended for General Sherman until he receives other orders.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Brevet Major-General.