War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0564 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

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mence at daylight to tear up the railroad. The First Brigade will commence at the station, and work eastward; the Second Brigade will commence one mile east of the station, and the Third Brigade two miles east of the station, each working eastward. It is expected that each brigade will thoroughly destroy two miles of the track per day. The rails must be thoroughly destroyed by heating and twisting. Two companies of the Michigan Engineers will work with each brigade. Brigade commanders will throw out sufficient guard to protect themselves while working. No vehicles can be taken with the division, the road being entirely impracticable for wagons. All tolls, baggage, and provisions must be carried on pack-animals, and as few of these as possible should be allowed.

By command of Brigadier General N. J. Jackson:

GEO. ROBINSON,

First Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

FLAG STEAMER PHILADELPHIA,

Port Royal Harbor, November 27, 1864.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Department of the South, Headquarters Hilton Head:

SIR: The horses you are so good as to offer will be very acceptable. The trouble will be for forage, unless an order is given to that effect from the army supplies. I would also ask for drivers or teamsters, having no persons aboard familiar with the care of horses. When the seamen are landed with the howitzers it will be impossible for the vessels to ration them. Can an order be given to your commissariat for rations while ashore?

I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. DAHLGREN,

Rear-Admiral, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., November 27, 1864.

Brigadier General R. SAXTON, Commanding District of Beaufort:

GENERAL: The major-General commanding directs that you have the One hundred and twenty-seventh [New York] Regiment entire, one section of artillery, and all of the Twenty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops that can be spared, prepared to march at an hour's notice. The men will be provided with five days' cooked rations. The rations of coffee, sugar, and salt must be put up in separate bags, which will have to be prepared for the purpose, and carried so as not to be dissolved nor mixed with other provisions. Each man will carry an overcoat, rubber blanket, and one extra pair of socks. All the men must wear shoes. One hundred rounds of ammunition per man will be brought in boxes, of which twenty extra rounds per man will be distributed previous to landing. You will embark the troops on board the steamers John Adams and Philadelphia. After the above-mentioned troops are embarked, transportation will be sent for one-half of the One hundred and second U. S. Colored Troops, which will be in readiness, the men being equipped as directed above.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.