War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0526 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

Search Civil War Official Records

General Potter, composed of parts of nine regiments, from here, Beaufort, and Florida; also, four pieces of Day's battery and fifty cavalry from Florida. If you desire the services of General Saxton in command of one of the brigades, I will order him to report; but otherwise, not. Let me know upon this last point at once.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., November 22, 1864.

Brigadier General E. E. POTTER,

Commanding Hilton Head District:

I am instructed by the major-General commanding to state that the movement of which he spoke to you has been postponed until the 27th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. DEAN,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., November 22, 1864.

Brigadier General E. P. SCAMMON,

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla.:

GENERAL: The information received indicates that General Sherman is rapidly marching toward the eastern sea-ports. I am, therefore, getting ready to make an attack upon some point of the enemy's line, so as to aid him. For this purpose, I am getting together all the regiments that can be spared from all the districts. I shall require from your district two regiments and four pieces of artillery from Day's battery. These will have to be sent so as to leave the Saint John's River by the evening of the 26th instant, if possible. You will have to issue immediately orders to prepare them for the move. You had better select the regiments most disposable, and order them to bring five days' cooked rations. The rations of coffee, sugar, and salt must be put up in separate bags, which will have to be prepared for the purpose, and carried so as not to be dissolved nor mixed with other portions of the provisions. Each man will carry his blanket, overcoat, rubber blanket or shelter-tent, and one extra pair of good socks. All the men must wear shoes. Each man will likewise carry twenty extra rounds of ammunition. One hundred rounds will be brought with the troops in boxes, and twenty rounds to be distributed previous to landing. I expect these two regiments to number 1,000 effective men; if not, you must, if possible, add a company or more to make the number. Besides the infantry and artillery, you will also send fifty men of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry mounted, equipped, and prepared for active service. The Wyoming will bring the artillery to the best advantage; the Mary Benton and Delaware will carry the infantry and cavalry; with another steamer to be sent to guard against accidents.

Respectfully, yours,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.