War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0519 Chapter LVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Cobb's Plantation, November 22, 1864.

General HOWARD,

Commanding Army of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: I am directed by the General-in-chief to write you as follows: The march of this wing has been, since leaving Atlanta, in two columns, and very successful up to this time. The Fourteenth Corps is now on the Hillsborough road, ten miles west of Milledgeville, and the Twentieth Corps must now be in the capital, having marched by the Eatonton road. The Georgia railroad, from the including the Oconee bridge, west to Lithonia, is well destroyed. Troops in fine condition, having fed high on sweet potatoes and poultry. Stock is also doing well though the roads have been very heavy.

The general desires you will report to him at Milledgeville to-morrow (where he will go early), in detail, your operations since leaving Atlanta; also, the position of your command, in view of his making further orders. In the meantime you cannot do too much permanent damage to that railroad east of Macon or about Gordon. You will also notify General Kilpatrick a similar report is desired from him.

I am, General, respectfully, yours, &c.,

L. M. DAYTON,

Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Gordon, GA., November 22, 1864--3 p. m.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding, &c.:

I send you, by General Kilpatrick, dispatches just captured. My command will be pretty well closed up to-night. I have directed Major-General Blair to push Giles A. Smith's division, with a regiment of cavalry to try and save the railroad bridge over the Oconee. I shall move, as soon as the bridge can be gotten up, to the crossing six miles below that bridge. I hope, however, before starting, to hear from you. I sent dispatches to you this morning by Captain Duncan.

Respectfully, &c.,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

MACON, Thursday Morning, November 17, 1864.

DEAR GOVERNOR: Things are very bad here. Sherman in person is leading, say, 30,000 men against us. We are retreating as rapidly as possible consistent with order and efficiency. The militia are retreating in admirable order and good discipline, as General Cobb reports. I will meet them between this and Forsyth this evening. I believe the Legislature will grant you large and liberal powers. Tell them the country is in danger. Let all of her sons come to the rescue.

Yours, faithfully,

R. TOOMBS.

P. S. --We have called for the troops in Wilmington, Charleston, and Savannah. If we do defend here they will be on us by Monday. Cavalry force said to be about 6,000. Send all the troops you can. If we do not get help we must abandon this place.

Yours,

R. TOOMBS.