War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0282 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

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I submit the following estimate of property and supplies appropriated or destroyed by my command during the march from Atlanta to Savannah:

Taken for use:

Horses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Mules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267

Corn. . Pounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299,421

Corn fodder. . Do. . . . . . . . . . . 262,000

Rice fodder. . Do. . . . . . . . . . . 88,000

Beef-cattle. . Head. . . . . . . . . 700

Bacon. . Pounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,700

Sugar. . Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000

Molasses. . Gallons. . . . . . . . . . 1,000

Taken for use:

Potatoes. . Bushels. . . . . . . . . 2,000

Meal. . Saks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250

Salt. . Barrels. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Destroyed:

Cotton bales. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,700

Cotton gins and mills. . . . . . 50

Flour mills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Saw-mills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Factories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

The amounts of articles of forage and subsistence given above are those given in the returns of my quartermaster and commissary. In addition to these amounts, there was doubtless as much more of all such articles taken by the division for use of the men and animals, who subsisted bounteously on the country passed through.

Railroad destroyed.

On East Point Railroad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Between Atlanta and Chattahoochee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1/2

Between Social Circle and Madison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Between Madison and Oconee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Between Milledgeville and Gordon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Between Tennille and Davisborough. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

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Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 1/2

Railroad bridges across the Oconee and Ocmulgee, besides a large number of small bridges, trestle, water-tanks, &c. ; also large quantities of new ties, railroad timbers, cord wood, &c.

The following table will show the casualties and losses in my command during the entire campaign:

During the march. During siege of Savannah.

Officers. Men. Officers. Men.

Killed. . . . 1 8

Wounded. . . 1 5 53

Missing. . 37 . 9

Total. . . 38 6 70

In concluding this report, I must express my high appreciation of the officers and men whom I have so long commanded, and whose conduct and general discipline on this campaign were worthy of their past well-earned reputation.

I desire to return my thanks to the gentleman composing my staff, departmental and personal. Some deserve special mention for their efficiency and uniform attention to duty. To Captain W. T. Forbes, assistant adjutant-General, I am especially indebted for the faithful performance of every duty devolving upon him. I must also commend Captain Eugene Schilling, my topographical engineer, for his general